News


Summer snapshots from ECT in Cheshire

December 04, 2019

Summer snapshots from ECT in Cheshire image

As winter draws in, we’re keeping warm by reflecting on some of the highlights from this year’s Summer Day Trips provided by ECT in Cheshire.

Our drivers took almost 400 passengers* to seven destinations – from a scenic tour along the picturesque North Wales coast to a trip to Bury’s bustling open-air market.

At ECT in Cheshire, we offer an annual programme of free summer and seasonal day trips to our PlusBus members. Registration with PlusBus is free and we always welcome new members! We offer these trips free-of-charge as part of our charitable aim to tackle social isolation in our local communities.

Getting out and about is not a simple task for many of our passengers, who often struggle to leave the house independently due to mobility difficulties. All of our drivers are highly trained in assisting passengers of all mobilities and our vehicles are fully accessible.

Our Day Trips programme brought a little summer sunshine into our passengers’ lives – a chance both to enjoy the warm weather and spend time socialising with friends old and new. In fact, many of our passengers enjoyed it so much that they joined us on more than one Day Trip this summer!

Here are a few of our favourite summer snapshots – along with some of the reasons why passengers told us they enjoyed the Day Trips this year.


“Thanks to the Day Trips, I can…

…See new places

Jeanne Snape

For Jeanne Snape, the Day Trip to Snowdonia National Park – which started on the picturesque Rhug Estate organic farm and took passengers on a scenic drive along the North Wales coast before arriving at the Park – was a chance for her to see somewhere completely new.

“It was my first time in Snowdonia, and it was beautiful,” she says. “I don’t get out much, so each trip is enjoyable and something to look forward to.”


Irene Robson

… Meet new people

“I like to be out and about – but living on my own means I don’t travel far, so these trips really cheer me up,” says Irene Robson. This year she came on our Summer Day Trip to the Manchester Museum to meet new people and visit somewhere she couldn’t get to alone.

“We visit lovely places, and the drivers are very helpful and friendly. It gives all of us something to look forward to.”


Greate Orme

… Take a trip down memory lane

Day Trips to the North Wales coast were very popular this year – with a total of 13 full minibuses throughout the summer heading out for a day spent travelling through scenic towns and villages along the coast, followed by a trip around the beautiful Great Orme private coastal road.

“I’m Welsh, so the places we went to brought back memories of the places I knew so well in the past. Wonderful!” says passenger Olwen Dodd.


Jo

… Travel independently

Lesley and John Boylin went on a trip to Ness Gardens, where they had the chance to explore some of the 64 acres of gardens and enjoy views of the River Dee.

The pair used to volunteer at the Gardens, so for them it was a special chance to go back – and without having to call upon relatives to help. “I enjoyed getting out of the house independently without having to rely on my family,” says Lesley.


George Jewkes

… Feel confident and safe

Brigitte and George Jewkes say this year’s trip to the North Wales coast was a nostalgic one. “We don’t go anywhere anymore, and this was a chance to see a bit of Wales again. We enjoyed visiting places we used to go to 40 or so years ago.”

They also felt safe in the care of ECT in Cheshire’s staff. “We don’t have the confidence to go on the big coaches of other travel firms.”


Ian Dibbert

And what did the drivers think?

It was a matter of “all hands on deck” from the ECT in Cheshire drivers to make the trips happen this year. “Organising these Day Trips is a big job,” says Ian Dibbert, general manager at ECT in Cheshire. “And there wasn’t one person in our team who didn’t get involved.”

The drivers see first-hand how much the passengers value the experience. He says: “Drivers tell me they really enjoy being able to give people happy memories – and that passengers are always very thankful to them afterwards. We even got a round of applause on the bus from passengers on one of the Day Trips to north Wales!”


If you want to find out more about free Day Trips with ECT in Cheshire, contact 0151 357 4420 or read this leaflet for information on our upcoming seasonal Day Trips.

*ECT in Cheshire delivered 387 ‘passenger journeys’ during the Summer Day Trips programme in 2019.


Categories: Cheshire

NEW FILM: Why ECT Charity leads the way with measuring social value

November 19, 2019

NEW FILM: Why ECT Charity leads the way with measuring social value image
NEW FILM: Why ECT Charity leads the way with measuring social value

ECT Charity is excited to announce the launch of a new film which showcases how it enables people to live more independent lives and engage with their local community.

The film – which was created as a part of ECT Charity’s prize for becoming 2019’s NatWest SE100 Impact Champion – takes viewers along on a journey with Jean, a regular passenger who uses ECT Charity’s community transport services to attend health appointments and her weekly lunch club.

During the film, Jean says that ECT Charity – who provide safe, accessible and affordable community transport services to thousands of people across the UK who struggle with mainstream public transport – has made her “much more independent”.

The film also showcases ECT Charity’s pioneering Toolkit that was developed to enable community transport organisations measure and demonstrate their social value: Measuring Up: The CT Social Value Toolkit.

Anna Whitty MBE, ECT Charity’s CEO, explains, “As local councils are reducing their budgets and community services are increasingly being cut, it is essential that community transport organisations are able to measure the social value they provide in a quantifiable way”.

The Toolkit played a key role in helping the charity win the NatWest SE100 Impact Award, which recognises enterprises that “take considerable measures to demonstrate and communicate the social or environmental impact of their organisation”.

Run by Pioneers Post magazine in partnership with NatWest bank, the SE100 Awards are an annual initiative recognising the top 100 social enterprises in the UK, and among them, seven award winners across a range of categories.

Watch the film above (or click here) to find out how ECT Charity’s Toolkit is helping community transport organisations communicate the social value of their work and to discover how the charity gives passengers the opportunity to get out and about.


Measuring Up: The CT Social Value Toolkit enables community transport organisations to more clearly communicate their value to councils, commissioners, communities, passengers and government policymakers. See here for more information on the Toolkit or contact socialvalue@ectcharity.co.uk.

You can read more about ECT Charity being named NatWest SE100 Impact Champion 2019 here.


Categories: ECT Charity, Ealing

Goodbye Cornwall

October 31, 2019

Goodbye Cornwall image

“As the old adage goes “when the going gets tough, the tough get going” and as a CEO of a highly-regarded charity, I know that part of my role is to make tough decisions.

The Charity Commission’s guidance makes it very clear that when it comes to making decisions, my number one priority is to look after ECT Charity’s best interests. When making decisions to fulfil this duty, constantly worrying about how our beneficiaries and staff will be impacted makes these decisions all the more difficult to make – that’s when the going definitely gets tougher.

I vividly remember launching our Cornwall operation in the summer of 2014 as an outstation of our Dorset operation, managed by Tim Christian. The community was crying out for additional community transport resources and there was so much that we could offer. As a charity, our aim was to deliver home-to-school journeys for students with complex learning needs and disabilities which would support our charitable objectives and create social value for the local community. We were welcomed warmly by parents and the local authority alike, and were proud to be able to showcase our quality, standards and caring service.

The next natural step was to form a three-way partnership between Cornwall Council, First Kernow (the Cornish bus business that forms part of FirstGroup plc), and us (a charity that provides community transport in local communities).

Some of our team in Cornwall
Some of our team in Cornwall

The handshakes between partners at the stakeholder event in the summer of 2016 were full of promise for years to come. Our collective aim was to knit together big bus options with our flexible community transport solutions in order to provide innovative and joined-up transport solutions. This came at a time when Cornwall Council was looking for a more flexible and efficient use of financial and physical resources as part of its “One Transport for Cornwall” project.

Three years later, despite our best efforts, the partnership has not progressed in the way we envisaged and there has been little opportunity to create social value for the local community. And so I recently had to make the difficult recommendation to ECT’s Board of Trustees that ECT withdraw from Cornwall once its contracts with Cornwall Council terminated at the end of the summer term 2019, as well as not tendering for new contracts.

For five years, we have been proud to serve Pencalenick and Doubletrees schools. We are very grateful for the hard work of our fantastic team (pictured above): Kevin, Michelle, Paul, Sue, Glynis, Teresa and Kenny – with a special mention of Kevin who has been with us since the start! They have showed utmost professionalism and dedication at all times. And last but not least, none of our work in Cornwall would have been possible without Tim and his team in Dorset, demonstrating that an ‘outstation’ model can work just as effectively a further hundred miles down the road!

Our success and excellent reputation in Cornwall is testimony to the dedication and commitment of our teams. I am proud of what we accomplished in Cornwall and I know that Tim is very proud too. Our sincere thanks to all our Cornwall staff and very best wishes for the future.”

Anna Whitty MBE


Top image (from left to right): Alex Carter (Managing Director, First South West Ltd), Councillor Bert Biscoe (Portfolio Holder for Transport, Cornwall Council), Anna Whitty MBE (CEO, ECT Charity)


Categories: ECT Charity

Dorset Community Transport is shortlisted for national Community Transport Award

October 03, 2019

Dorset Community Transport is shortlisted for national  Community Transport Award image
Dorset Community Transport is shortlisted for national Community Transport Award

Dorset Community Transport (DCT) is delighted to announce that it has been shortlisted for this year’s Community Transport Awards for its crucial work towards ending rural isolation for local people.

Organised by the Community Transport Association, the awards celebrate excellence in the community transport sector across the UK and highlight those who have gone above and beyond for their local communities.

This year, DCT joins just two other organisations – Fellrunner Village Bus, and Llanwrtyd Wells Community Transport – as a finalist in the ‘Serving Rural Communities’ category, which highlights organisations “doing excellent work to enable people living in rural communities to access services that they may otherwise be denied”. The winner will be announced on 12 November at a Community Transport Awards dinner.

DCT’s submission highlighted its work in keeping local bus services 97 and 88 – which are primarily used by elderly people who have no other means of travelling to market towns – up and running following council funding cuts.

DCT gave the example of 73-year-old passenger Mary Head, who is totally reliant on DCT’s “little green bus”. She says, “Where I live is very isolated, and when I found out that the council was cutting my usual route I was mortified. It actually made me feel really depressed.

“For someone living alone, who is perhaps not able to walk very well and has not got family around, you need to be able to get out and have something to look forward to.”

DCT provided further examples of how they help people in rural communities: from helping those with mobility difficulties travel to vital health appointments, to enabling pupils at rural schools to experience enriching extra-curricular activities and trips that would otherwise not have been possible.

For instance, thanks to DCT, pupils at Cerne Abbas CE VC First School and Spetisbury CE Primary School now attend swimming lessons, choir practices, science activities and more.

Tim Christian, general manager at DCT, said: “Many Dorset villages are not served by any buses whatsoever, and often residents have no access to basic amenities.

“At DCT, we have been working hard since 2011 to offer people – particularly those who are vulnerable or socially isolated – a means of getting out and staying connected to their community. I’m very proud that our work has been recognised in the shortlist for a national award, and particularly in the ‘Serving Rural Communities’ category, because that is exactly what we do.”


Categories: Dorset

ECT’s Transport Fund helps local group experience calming effect of nature at Kew Gardens

September 19, 2019

ECT’s Transport Fund helps local group experience calming effect of nature at Kew Gardens image
Journey Makers: ECT’s Transport Fund helps local group experience calming effect of nature at Kew Gardens

Ealing Community Transport (ECT) understands the incredible impact that a day out can have for elderly people and those living with dementia – from broadening their expectations of where they are still able to visit, to reducing their feelings of isolation.

Thanks to ECT’s Transport Fund, community groups can apply for funding to offset the cost of travel for these types of trips. Read on to discover how one group used this funding to organise outings for members of a Day Centre for people living with dementia.


Spread across 300 acres and home to more than 50,000 plants, London’s Kew Gardens makes a very peaceful setting for a summer stroll. For Jennifer Forrester-Powell, Director and Day Centre Manager at the Clementina Day Centre, it was the perfect place to visit on a day trip for their members living with dementia. “It’s very serene. I think those types of environments are good, not just for older people but everyone, to de-stress them.”

The group spent the day walking around the gardens’ beautiful trees and colourful flower displays, as well as taking some time to relax at the café. It was a true antidote to the loneliness and isolation felt by some members. “Many of our day centre members live alone,” says Jennifer. “So being among other people out and about is nice for them.”

Organising group excursions can be a big job, but having ECT to help with the transport took off some of the pressure for Jennifer. “ECT had the timings for collecting everyone all organised, which did a lot of the job for me and the team.”

The cost of the day’s transport was covered by ECT, thanks to a grant the Clementina Day Centre recently received from ECT’s Transport Fund. The fund helps support local organisations create social opportunities for isolated individuals through local accessible community transport – successful applicants can receive up to £1,000 to offset the cost of transport provided by ECT.

In addition to taking the group on outings, ECT has been providing transport for members to attend the Day Centre – which welcomes up to 20 members three times a week – for the past four years. Families of the Day Centre’s members tell Jennifer that they feel confident that their loved ones are being cared for as soon as they are picked up from their front door. “The drivers go above and beyond a typical transport service,” she says. “They are compassionate with our members, and they give really helpful feedback about how everyone seemed on the bus in the morning – if someone doesn’t appear well, they let us know.”

The Day Centre does not have sufficient funding for its own transport service, and its members – many of whom are cognitively impaired – say that travelling by taxi or public transport can be frightening. Jean, a Day Centre member, says: “Transport with ECT means I can attend the Centre, which breaks up my week. It gives me something to do that I enjoy.”

Jennifer believes that without ECT, many members would have great difficulty attending the Day Centre. “People would be unable to leave their homes. But together, ECT and the Day Centre are providing vital opportunities for people to form friendships, and the knock-on effect of that is they live longer, they’re healthier, they’re happier.”

Thanks to the grant, Jennifer has been busy planning a packed schedule of group outings for the rest of the year. These include a trip to Hanwell Zoo, a dementia-friendly screening of the classic 1942 film Casablanca, and a Christmas lights tour in December. The Day Centre members will also be returning to Kew Gardens in October for a Dementia Friendly Health Walk and a Tool Shed garden activity led by the staff at Kew.

Anna Whitty MBE, Chief Executive at ECT, says the fund is a key part of ECT’s charitable aim to support local organisations in ending social isolation. “We really value partnerships like the one we have with the Clementina Day Centre,” says Anna. “So we’re thrilled that the fund has given them a boost in the work they are doing to end loneliness – especially to settings as beautiful and calming as Kew Gardens.”


If your community or voluntary group is providing new community-based activities, it might be eligible for up to £1,000 of funding for transport. Find out more here.


Categories: Ealing

ECT Charity’s CEO Anna Whitty named Cause4’s ‘Charity Leader of the Month’

August 27, 2019

ECT Charity’s CEO Anna Whitty named Cause4’s ‘Charity Leader of the Month’ image
ECT Charity’s CEO Anna Whitty named Cause4’s ‘Charity Leader of the Month’

Anna Whitty, ECT Charity’s CEO, has been recognised as Cause4’s ‘Charity Leader of the Month’ for August.

Cause4 is a social enterprise that partners with charitable organisations to help them develop, grow and raise funds. Every month, it releases a ‘Pick of the Month’ blog piece, highlighting social enterprise, charity and third sector leaders under four categories – including ‘Charity Leader of the Month’.

Anna joins an impressive list of individuals highlighted for August, including Jess Thompson, Founder of Migrateful, a social enterprise that empowers refugees through cookery classes; Roy Montague-Jones, a Trustee for an organisation supporting education in Mumbai called Muktangan UK Trust; and the Head of Business Development at Manchester’s People’s History Museum, Sarah Miguel.

The blog piece describes Anna’s passion for helping other community transport organisations prove their social value – and how that lead her to develop a pioneering toolkit to measure the value of community transport organisations last year.

It adds that in 2016, she was awarded an MBE in the Queen’s 90th Birthday Honours in recognition of her major contribution to community transport.

Also mentioned is the work of ECT Charity, and how it provides accessible and affordable community transport for people across the UK, many of whom struggle with mainstream transport.

Anna said: “Every day, community transport organisations work hard to enable lonely and isolated people to leave their homes. Often, it is the only chance passengers get to speak to anyone all week.

I’m delighted to have been chosen as Cause4’s Charity Leader of the Month – it’s another opportunity to highlight the essential role of community transport and the social value it creates.”


Read the full blog piece here.


Categories: ECT Charity

Journey Makers: Chester residents discover a new world of day trips thanks to ECT in Cheshire

August 06, 2019

Journey Makers: Chester residents discover a new world of day trips thanks to ECT in Cheshire image
Journey Makers: Chester residents discover a new world of day trips thanks to ECT in Cheshire

ECT in Cheshire makes independent travel less daunting for elderly people and those who struggle with mainstream transport – ensuring passengers always feel safe and supported when exploring new places.

In our latest Journey Makers feature, we discover how community transport has transformed the way members of an organisation supporting the elderly in Chester feel about getting out and about.


One year ago, the idea of heading out for a day trip somewhere new seemed like a frightening prospect to many members of Here and Now, a social enterprise that works to enhance the lives of elderly and isolated people in Chester.

But since being introduced to ECT in Cheshire’s services in September 2018, attitudes have changed for regulars attending Here and Now’s learning and social groups, which welcome around 70 people every week.

Karen Smith, Here and Now’s Voluntary Director and Team Leader, explains how:

“Many people lack the confidence to travel independently, so for some of our members the buses have enabled them to go out for a meal or to a garden centre for the first time in years.

“One lady told me she hadn’t had a meal out and a glass of wine for ten years because she was too afraid to go out on her own, but she recently enjoyed a trip out to eat with us all.

“From starting out as very apprehensive, now they’re always asking, ‘When’s the next trip planned?’, ‘Where are we going?’. They feel safe and cared for by the drivers, so they’re no longer fearful of travelling alone.”

Karen says that thanks to ECT in Cheshire’s accessible minibuses, they can now include people of all mobility levels when planning days out.

“Before, our group members who use walking aids and wheelchairs were not able to come along on trips, because I couldn’t afford to hire a private coach with a tail lift. But now we can all go out together.”

Karen adds that she is now able to offer a greater range of experiences to group members than ever before.

“We only used to go on about one or two trips a year. Most of our volunteers are ladies over 60 who don’t drive, so we’d use a taxi, but we were very limited on where we could go because of the cost.

“But since we started to use the buses eight months ago, we’ve been on about eight or nine trips already. We’ve been out to garden centres, cream teas and meals out, and we’re hoping to book a trip to the theatre soon.”

Karen reports that some of her members have had such a positive experience with ECT in Cheshire that they are now also using the charity’s PlusBus service, which picks up individuals straight from their door for trips out to the shops, or wherever else they might need to go.

“Some of the ladies are now using the PlusBus service to go out independently too, because going on our trips has built up their confidence to travel alone. So the service has opened up a new world for our members.”

Anna Whitty MBE, CEO of ECT Charity said “This is a fabulous example of how the introduction of safe and affordable transport can change the lives of isolated individuals who have lost confidence to go out alone. Being able to travel to visit friends or go shopping is crucial to maintaining independent living, and it is great that our passengers get to discover a new world on the way!”


Find out more about ECT in Cheshire’s door-to-door PlusBus service here.

Find out more about the different types of transport services we offer in Cheshire here.


Categories: Cheshire, Journey Makers

Journey Makers: Party of the century! 100 year old passenger celebrates birthday on Dorset Community Transport bus

July 30, 2019

Journey Makers: Party of the century! 100 year old passenger celebrates birthday on Dorset Community Transport bus image
Party of the century! 100 year old passenger celebrates birthday on Dorset Community Transport bus

This time in our Journey Makers series, one Dorset Community Transport (DCT) passenger proves that with the right transport services available, age is just a number...


Passengers boarding the DCT Service 88 into Wimborne recently would have been surprised to see a bus festooned in party decorations, as they were invited to join in on a very special celebration.

The festivities had been arranged for regular passenger Eddie Drake – who was turning 100 that very day.

Following a jovial bus journey which included a birthday song and sweet treats being handed around, visiting family members then accompanied Eddie to the Wimborne café where he usually goes for breakfast once a week.

The celebrations were all made possible thanks to DCT driver Steve Wardman, who often takes Eddie on his trips into town and, from their frequent chats, had discovered that he was going to be celebrating the beginning of his second century.

Eddie’s son Keith described the celebration as “a lovely gesture”. He commented: “A normal bus service or a taxi just wouldn’t know about his birthday. But Steve, the bus driver, was the one who suggested the celebrations. It’s a caring service, and a personal one. Steve knows my dad, and my dad knows him.”

Keith says his father also values the relationship he has built with the other passengers on the bus. “Just knowing that he’s still going out and seeing other people is great. He has friends on the bus, if you look at the picture (see image above), that’s the lady he sits next to on the bus every week. On his birthday, everyone on the bus knew him and they all sang happy birthday to him.”

Being able to use DCT’s services has meant that being 100 has not stopped his dad from travelling independently, adds Keith. “It’s great to know that he’s got the wherewithal at his age to want to go on the bus and go into town and get his pension and have a cup of tea and a sandwich.”

He adds that Service 88 is a lifeline for several residents of the estate where Eddie lives. And when Dorset County Council funding cuts meant the service was temporarily withdrawn in July 2017, he was concerned that many of them would suffer.

“I wrote to Dorset County Council and said ‘why have you stopped the bus?’.

“It’s a big estate with a lot of elderly people – so there is no way the people who live there could get up to Wimborne without getting in a taxi. A lot of people haven’t got the money to do that, so the bus is vital for them. My dad missed the service when it went, that’s for certain.”

Tim Christian, general manager at DCT, says he is thrilled that DCT – with financial support from Wimborne Minster Town Council, Wimborne Business Improvement District and Colehill Parish Council – was able to get the service back up and running just four months after it was cut. The route has subsequently received support from Sturminster Marshall Parish Council.

“We are delighted to be working with local town and parish councils to continue to offer people what might be their only chance in a week to get out. Whether they are going shopping for groceries, visiting their GP – or like Eddie, heading to a café for a change of scenery and some breakfast.

“As Eddie’s story shows, even turning 100 doesn’t have to stop you from being independent and mobile if accessible and affordable community transport options are available.”


Do you know someone that could use Dorset Community Transport to stay active and independent? Contact the team on 01258 287980.


Categories: Dorset, Journey Makers

Journey Makers: Local councillors team together to combat isolation in Dorset

July 17, 2019

Journey Makers: Local councillors team together to combat isolation in Dorset image
Journey Makers: Local councillors team together to combat isolation in Dorset

At a time when village shops are disappearing and public services are being cut back, Dorset Community Transport (DCT) has been working with local councillors to help villagers stay connected to basic amenities.

In this Journey Makers story, we focus on a group of councillors whose engagement with DCT has ensured that a crucial local bus service remains up and running.


This Journey Makers story revolves around Service 97, a crucial local bus service connecting residents from East Dorset villages to their nearest towns.

The bus, which serves the villages of Alderholt, Cripplestyle, Cranborne, Edmondsham and Woodlands, was saved by Dorset Community Transport (DCT) after it was nearly lost following council funding cuts in July 2017.

Key to the continuing existence and success of the bus service has been a group of councillors who came together to support the service in partnership with DCT. This Working Group meets four times a year to ensure the bus service remains sustainable and viable, and includes representatives from Alderholt Parish Council, Cranborne and Edmondsham Parish Council, and Knowlton Parish Council, as well as Tim Christian, general manager at DCT.

Working Group member Councillor Jerry Laker, Chair of Knowlton Parish Council, says the bus is the only viable means of transport for many villagers to access basic services like supermarkets, doctors’ surgeries and libraries.

“There’s very little in terms of village services, and you only have to look at the regular queues for the outbound bus, and laden shopping bags on the return bus, to see what a practical solution Service 97 has become,” says Jerry.

He adds that DCT was able to extend the route to stop at Woodlands, a village served by his parish council. “So we can now provide something for people in that area who have a real need for public transport.”

Jerry says the Working Group is an example of what can be achieved when councillors come together with their local community transport provider to address a problem, particularly in the recent wake of the region’s nine district and borough councils being replaced with two unitary councils.

“We have to stand on our own collective feet. Now we no longer have a district council to talk with, we have to say, ‘Okay, we might find difficulty doing this on our own, but if we get our heads together we might find a solution that is beneficial to all of us’,” he says. And they have!

Councillor Gina Logan, of Alderholt Parish Council, is full of admiration for the team at DCT “who provide the vehicles, maintain and insure them, undertake the administration and train the drivers”.

She says: “The drivers, by knowing the regular users, are able to maintain an ongoing awareness as to their wellbeing, for example through asking why a passenger might not have made it onto the bus that day.”

Service 97 passenger Beryl Broughton uses the service regularly. She says: “I’m a pensioner and am no longer able to drive. As well as using the bus to get to the doctor and to go shopping, I use the route to go to Fordingbridge where I can catch a bus to go further afield, which gets me out of the house, keeps me mobile and the brain working. My friends are all elderly and don’t drive, so without a bus I would be completely stuck.”

Mrs Margaret Hill, another passenger, says it’s not just a matter of getting from A to B: “I am now in my 80s and I use the service at least twice a week. We don’t have a taxi service in Alderholt, so the bus remains my only form of transport. Getting on the bus itself is a social occasion: the bus drivers are wonderful and I get to meet other passengers for a chat.”

Tim Christian, general manager at DCT said “community transport is all about finding solutions. This partnership has demonstrated what is achievable when we work together within the community. The efforts of the Working Group have had a big impact on the passengers, preventing loneliness and isolation and making sure that villagers can remain independent”.


Do you have a local issue that could use some help from Dorset Community Transport? Contact the team on 01258 287980.


Categories: Dorset, Journey Makers

Journey Makers: School’s in for out-of-catchment kids in one isolated Dorset village!

May 29, 2019

Journey Makers: School’s in for out-of-catchment kids in one isolated Dorset village! image
Journey Makers: School’s in for out-of-catchment kids in one isolated Dorset village!

Dorset Community Transport (DCT) is committed to making journeys possible for a wide range of people of all ages – especially those living in rural and isolated areas.

So when a local school in the remote countryside got in touch to ask if we could help when their existing bus service was cut, we were keen to find a solution, as our latest Journey Makers story illustrates.


It’s morning in a small village in the heart of the West Dorset countryside, and a new day at Powerstock Primary School is about to begin.

Arriving outside just before 9am is a little green bus, packed full of energetic children from Bridport and the surrounding areas, ready to start their day of activities and learning.

As a small but thriving school in a relatively sparsely-populated part of the countryside, it’s no surprise that Powerstock regularly takes a good number of pupils from outside their catchment area.

But being isolated doesn’t make the journey to school easy for these children and their parents – particularly after public funding cuts resulted in the withdrawal of their local bus service nearly two years ago.

As a charity focused on helping people with their transport needs, Dorset Community Transport (DCT) was happy to step in when head teacher Louise Greenham got in touch.

Keen to create a solution together, they calculated that the DCT drivers completing earlier school journeys in the Bridport area could then go on to pick up the Powerstock pupils living in Bridport, and transport them to school for 9am.

Now the dedicated school bus service is approaching its two-year anniversary, and Tim Christian, general manager at DCT, has been reflecting on the value of such partnerships.

“The head teacher, Mrs Greenham, is a true Journey Maker,” says Tim. “Thanks to her initiative in getting in touch, we were able to devise a sustainable solution together in time for the start of term.”

He adds: “It’s always great to be contacted by people with a positive mindset who we can work with to turn a potential problem into a solution.”

For her part, Mrs Greenham says DCT has been a resourceful and reliable partner. “We are very proud to have a dedicated school bus,” she says. “Thanks to DCT’s ‘can-do’ approach, we were able to devise a daily return service for our out-of-catchment children. The drivers are brilliant with the children and the service has been a great success with a full bus on most days!

“The children are safely belted in for each journey and really enjoy travelling together. It has been great working with Tim Christian and his team at DCT – they are so helpful and always keep the welfare and safety of the children as their top priority.”


Our Dorset transport services are as wide and varied as the county itself! Find out more here or call us on 01258 287980 to discuss how we can help you find a solution to your transport needs.


Categories: Dorset, Journey Makers

Journey Makers: Meet the small rural primary schools with big ambitions!

May 26, 2019

Journey Makers: Meet the small rural primary schools with big ambitions! image
Journey Makers: Meet the small rural primary schools with big ambitions!

Getting a good education is not only about reading, writing and arithmetic - it is also about giving children opportunities to have the range of experiences that life has to offer.

Our latest Journey Makers story spotlights staff from two rural primary schools who have worked with Dorset Community Transport to arrange a vast array of enriching activities and trips for their pupils - from weekly swimming lessons to dinosaur museums…


We all know that extracurricular activities are a fundamental part of a fantastic education, but for rural schools, accessing these off-site can be very challenging. With the help of Dorset Community Transport (DCT), two small village primary schools in rural Dorset are showcasing what is possible if safe, affordable transport is available.

At Spetisbury CE Primary School, pupils are taken for regular swimming lessons, choir rehearsals at other schools, special science and maths activities, and more. These outings are made possible thanks to the school’s dedicated staff, as well as the partnership they have built with DCT which facilitates all of these journeys.

“DCT’s drivers have taken children in the green minibuses to golfing festivals at Milton Abbey and tag rugby festivals in Bournemouth,” says Shulay Erim, Support Services Manager at Spetisbury Primary. “And last Christmas, DCT very kindly didn’t charge us for the trip to Spetisbury Manor Care Home where the children sang for the elderly residents.

“We wouldn’t be able to do half the things that we do if it weren’t for DCT. We don’t want to ask parents to cover the school’s transport cost.

“Without DCT, we would have to hire very expensive coaches which would end up being half empty, or we would have to rely on staff cars, which would mean staff would have to be away from school. So DCT is a real asset in a community where you have small primary schools like ours.”

Over at Cerne Abbas CE VC First School, another small school in a rural area of Dorset, DCT’s buses have taken pupils to the local dinosaur museum and on bluebell walks, as well as journeys much further afield to destinations including the Sea Life Centre, a science centre in Bristol and even Salisbury Cathedral.

“Because of where we are located, we can’t do anything or go anywhere without transport,” says the school’s administration assistant, Andrea Schafer. “Since it’s such a small school, it’s not possible to have our own bus - so we’re reliant on people like DCT to get the children out for trips.”

For both schools, working with DCT is about far more than just affordable trips.

“Rather than hire a minibus with a driver from a normal transport company, we feel DCT is much more aware of the needs of the community and the children,” says Shulay. “They are also very reliable and have helpful drivers, with excellent communication from the office staff. I can just pick up the phone and ping them an email and I’ll get a response back straight away.”

Andrea says that DCT has become such an integral part of the school that the drivers feel like family. “Because we have had the same drivers over the years, they get to know the kids really well, so we all feel like they are part of our school. It’s a nice experience for the kids not having a stranger picking them up.”

Tim Christian, General Manager at DCT, comments: “Both of our Journey Maker schools show that being small and rural doesn’t mean you can’t make a big impact on behalf of your pupils – particularly when you have a partner like us to help get the children out and about. Shulay and Andrea are great examples of the people working behind the scenes – like our own admin staff – who play a really important role in making a difference to their community.”


If you think DCT could help take your school pupils out on new adventures, contact 01258 287980.


Categories: Dorset, Journey Makers

Journey Makers: How a partnership in Ealing is providing a new kind of prescription to deal with loneliness

April 18, 2019

Journey Makers: How a partnership in Ealing is providing a new kind of prescription to deal with loneliness image
ECT passenger Joyce Springer arriving at Age UK Ealing's Day Centre

Ealing Community Transport (ECT) is on a mission to end loneliness and isolation. We do this by enabling people who are unable to access mainstream transport to venture out of their homes, whether for a shopping trip, a health check-up, or a day out with friends.

We also believe in collaboration – and we are always keen to find new partnerships where our little green buses can make a big difference. In our latest Journey Makers story, we shine a light on one such partnership in Ealing, where our shared aims would not be possible to achieve without working together.


What do a community centre, a little green bus and the new concept of ‘social prescribing’ have in common?

They are all part of the latest partnership in Ealing to help combat loneliness among elderly people.

Loneliness and isolation not only have a direct effect on individuals’ health and wellbeing, but also impose a significant cost to the public purse. ECT’s research shows that in Ealing alone, these costs could reach £10m a year.

At Age UK Ealing’s Day Centre in Greenford, elderly visitors can relax with friends, eat freshly cooked meals and participate in activities like bingo or gentle exercise. They are often referred to the centre by their family or by a local GP who appreciates the positive impact of ‘prescribing’ non-clinical services offered within the community.

But having a place to socialise is no use if you don’t have the means to get there – and this is where ECT is able to help.

Currently, more than 20 people use ECT’s special transport service to get to the centre, and back home again, with several of them going twice or even three times a week. For some, it is the only opportunity they have all week to leave their homes and socialise.

Age UK Ealing’s interim CEO, Carrie Sage, comments: “It’s horrifying to see how isolated some older people are, even in our little part of London. They are left dangling without any support. When people visit us, we make sure there is a really good atmosphere for everyone. It brings together a diverse group of people with a diverse group of needs.”

Carrie (interim CEO in centre) with Day Care Assistants Carolyn (left) and Jan (right)
Carrie (Age UK Ealing’s interim CEO in centre) with
Day Care Assistants Carolyn (left) and Jan (right)

Carrie describes ECT as “the linchpin” to making the centre work. “If we didn’t have community transport to bring people here, the centre wouldn’t function,” she says.

“We get little notes the whole time, usually from family members saying, ‘You have no idea how much mum enjoys coming out to the centre’. That’s not just a reflection of the fact that there is a brilliant environment when they get there, it’s because ECT drivers are fabulous and take great care of their passengers.”

Carrie explains that it’s not just the drivers’ friendly and caring approach that is appreciated, but also the role they play in passing on important information: “One of the drivers might say, ‘Did you know so-and-so wasn’t feeling so great this morning?’ or tell us if they are worried about somebody – so there is a really good throughput of information, which can be critical to providing people with the support they need in terms of health and wellbeing.”

As well as the regular transport to the centre, the charities have also worked together to organise some more adventurous journeys – including a recent trip to see a pantomime, followed by afternoon tea.

“It was a brilliant day,” says Carrie. “These trips and outings are opportunities for ECT and Age UK Ealing to work together more closely. We both appreciate the importance of each other’s work, and I’m keen to grow our partnership further.”

Anna Whitty, ECT’s Chief Executive, says the feeling is mutual: “The transport partnership with Age UK Ealing is a brilliant example of ‘social prescribing’, with two charities working together to create a solution within the local community. It’s about using our different but complementary skills to deliver our shared aims.

“We are always excited to explore opportunities for collaboration where we can combine our energy and expertise to make a difference to the people and communities we serve.”


Read more about the transport services we offer in Ealing here.


Categories: Ealing, Journey Makers

ECT Charity is named NatWest SE100 Impact Champion 2019

April 02, 2019

ECT Charity is named NatWest SE100 Impact Champion 2019 image
ECT Charity is named NatWest SE100 Impact Champion 2019

The team at ECT Charity is celebrating this week after being named NatWest SE100 Impact Champion 2019.

The award was announced at a ceremony in London, before an audience of more than 200 social entrepreneurs from across the UK.

The judges praised ECT Charity for its skill and dedication in developing Measuring Up: The CT Social Value Toolkit, a pioneering new framework for measuring and demonstrating the charity’s social value. They were also impressed with the way ECT Charity had shared the methodology for use across the community transport sector.

Speaking at the event, Simon Jacobs, Chief Administration Officer at RBS/NatWest, who was hosting the evening, said: “It’s much harder to be a top social enterprise than a top enterprise. Not only do you need the great idea, you need to be able to sell it and communicate it. You need to be really clear about your impact.”

While accepting the award, ECT Charity Chief Executive Anna Whitty told the audience that for too long, community transport has been an “unsung hero” in terms of the crucial lifeline it gives to millions of people across the UK – whether this involves a simple trip to the shops, a check-up at the local GP or a day out with a group of friends.

She also described how loneliness and isolation among elderly people had become a major issue, and one that community transport was able to help solve. She asked: “Do you know that some people stay in their homes without talking to anyone all week?”

Speaking about ECT Charity’s focus on social value, she said: “Using the Social Value Toolkit enables us to clearly communicate the value of our services to a range of stakeholders, from councils and commissioners, to passengers or policymakers.”

She added that sharing the Toolkit across the community transport sector also illustrated one of ECT Charity’s core values: Collaboration and the sharing of success and ideas.

Patrick O’Keeffe, Chair of ECT Charity, applauded the commitment of the team and CEO – who was also a finalist in the awards’ Leadership category.

He said: “The CEO and the staff are the ones who work hard on a daily basis to bring people who are isolated and on their own back into the community. I’m really delighted that their dedication has been recognised with this national award.”

Run by Pioneers Post magazine in partnership with NatWest bank, the NatWest SE100 is an annual programme recognising the top 100 social enterprises in the UK, and among them, seven award winners across a range of categories.

The Impact Award won by ECT Charity recognises enterprises that “take considerable measures to demonstrate and communicate the social or environmental impact of their business, using this to improve their performance and win new business”.

Ben Carpenter, chief executive at Social Value UK and one of the judges of the Impact category, said: “The Impact Award was tough to judge this year. There were many excellent entries. It was particularly good to read about how social enterprises have been involving their service users in the design of their services. The winner ECT Charity should be applauded, not only for producing a very comprehensive impact framework but for sharing this with other similar organisations and allowing them to benefit as well.”


Measuring Up: The CT Social Value Toolkit enables community transport organisations to more clearly communicate their value to councils, commissioners, communities, passengers and government policymakers. See here for more information on the Toolkit, or contact socialvalue@ectcharity.co.uk.

Read more about the NatWest SE100 here.


Categories: ECT Charity

ECT Charity shortlisted for two NatWest SE100 Awards

March 25, 2019

ECT Charity shortlisted for two NatWest SE100 Awards image
ECT Charity shortlisted for two NatWest SE100 Awards

ECT Charity is delighted to announce that it has been shortlisted for two of this year’s NatWest SE100 Social Business Awards.

Run by Pioneers Post magazine in partnership with NatWest bank, the judges have chosen ECT for consideration in both the Impact and Leadership categories.

The Impact Award recognises enterprises that “take considerable measures to demonstrate and communicate the social or environmental impact of their business, using this to improve their performance and win new business”.

In the Leadership category – the shortlist of which names ECT’s Chief Executive Anna Whitty – the focus is on “social enterprise bosses demonstrating excellent leadership, effectiveness and inspiration in taking the team on a mission-driven journey to success”.

The winners, who have been selected from nearly 190 applicants from across the UK, will be revealed later this week, at a ceremony hosted by NatWest in central London.

Patrick O’Keeffe, Chair of ECT Charity, said: “We are really proud of what the ECT Charity team has achieved in this, our 40th Anniversary year. We have a clear social mission – to end social isolation through community transport. In developing our Social Value Toolkit, not only have we been able to demonstrate how ECT has made a difference, but we have enabled other community transport organisations to demonstrate the value of their work too.

“Our Chief Executive, Anna Whitty, has worked tirelessly over many years to build ECT into the successful organisation it is today – always focused on our charitable objectives, social impact and sustainability, and in addition, dedicated to sharing what we have learned with the broader community transport sector and social enterprise movement.”

Announcing the shortlist, Megan Peat, an SE100 judge and CEO of NatWest Social & Community Capital, said: “It’s fantastic to see so many great applications for the SE100 Awards, with the high standard across the board demonstrating the breadth and strength of the social enterprise sector in the UK. It made deciding on the winners very difficult for the judges so we look forward to welcoming all of those on the shortlist to the ceremony on 28th March.”

Eddie Finch, Partner in the Charity & Not-for-Profit team at Buzzacott accountants, who carried out due diligence for the awards, said the quality of the nominations in all categories was “the best I can recall in the nine years of our involvement”.

He added: “There was a fantastic mix of imaginative and inspiring start-ups and mature business organisations that continue to deliver on economic and social inclusion, environmental sustainability and a host of other social value aims.”


You can find the full shortlist for the NatWest SE100 here.


Categories: ECT Charity

Journey Makers: Amazing teamwork ensures safe arrival for snowbound young passengers in Cornwall

March 06, 2019

Journey Makers: Amazing teamwork ensures safe arrival for snowbound young passengers in Cornwall image
Journey Makers: Amazing teamwork ensures safe arrival for snowbound young passengers in Cornwall

ECT Charity is dedicated to inclusion and accessibility for all members of society, whatever their transport needs – and whatever the weather!

As our latest Journey Makers story from Cornwall demonstrates, we always go the extra mile to ensure the safety, comfort and well-being of our passengers, who rely on our dedicated team to deliver the transport they need, even in some very challenging circumstances.


We all know that weather forecasters sometimes get things wrong. But in Cornwall on Thursday 31 January, nobody was expecting such a snowy surprise.

As community transport driver Kevin Tait, and passenger assistant Michelle Searle, set off from a special educational needs (SEN) school in St Austell to return their young passengers to their remote home addresses, their progress was halted by a blockage ahead.

Despite forecasters predicting only some heavy rain in Cornwall that afternoon, a sudden flurry of snow had trapped a lorry on a country road ahead – and as the snow continued falling, a queue of traffic began to form behind our minibus. Two pupils with specific needs were still on board, and the team needed to get them home as swiftly as possible.

Meanwhile, another service was experiencing difficulties on the hilly terrain of St Austell, as it delivered pupils back home from a SEN school in Truro.

With one young passenger still on board, driver Paul Lesworth and passenger assistant Sue Tidy were forced to halt their minibus to avoid a slippery slope on the estate they had been serving.

Training, commitment and community spirit

With so much to deal with over a wide geographical area, the training, professionalism and commitment of all those involved kicked in to resolve the situation.

Community spirit was also running high – including one mother who offered shelter for the night, and the kind staff of a remote tyre workshop who delivered hot drinks and allowed use of their toilet facilities when Kevin and Michelle stopped outside.

After keeping their young passengers entertained with the radio and renditions of ‘Twinkle, Twinkle’, Michelle and Kevin liaised with the pupils’ families and got them safely home. Kevin then managed to deliver Michelle home, and arrived back himself nearly six hours since setting off earlier that afternoon.

Back on the other service, Paul and Sue also delivered their last passenger safely to his mother. Facing a long – and mostly uphill – journey back themselves, Sue was picked up by her husband, and Paul eventually managed to move away in his minibus and make the painstakingly slow and steady journey out of town to get home.

Everyone awoke the next morning to national headlines of Cornwall’s snowfall, with tales of hundreds of stranded road users spending the night on the floors of a college and roadside inn.

A tremendous effort

“I’m so proud of everybody who came together to help us get through this challenging situation and I want to pay tribute to the determination, perseverance and caring approach shown by all our staff,” says Tim Christian, General Manager.

“A tremendous effort from Kevin, Michelle, Paul and Sue – and those who offered support from the local community – saw everyone reach home safely.”

Tim adds: “All the parents affected were completely understanding, and the Cornwall team have received overwhelmingly positive feedback about how well the situation was handled.

“Well done to all – everybody went above and beyond the call of duty – but let’s hope the weather forecasters get it right next time!”


Categories: Journey Makers

Journey Makers: How ECT in Cheshire brought music and memories to people living with dementia

February 19, 2019

Journey Makers: How ECT in Cheshire brought music and memories to people living with dementia image
Journey Makers: How ECT in Cheshire brought music and memories to people living with dementia

ECT Charity is on a mission to end loneliness and isolation.

We do this by enabling those who are unable to access mainstream transport to venture out of their homes: whether for a shopping trip or doctor’s appointment, or an excursion to the seaside.

There are lots of people who work hard to make these journeys possible. Our Journey Makers series shines a light on them – from our well-trained, caring drivers to the community members who organise transport for local groups.


It can be devastating to see someone you love struggling to find the right words, and yet this is what happens to thousands of families affected by dementia every day. However, a creative team of performers has found a way to unlock the memories of people with dementia and give them a voice through music – and ECT in Cheshire recently played a key part in helping families participate.

The Turtle Song Project is run jointly by Turtle Key Arts, the Royal College of Music and the English Touring Opera. It gives people living with dementia the chance to compose and perform with professional musicians.

ECT in Cheshire was delighted to provide transport for the touring initiative’s first stop in Cheshire last autumn, taking a minibus full of participants to the University of Chester campus.

Over the ten-week programme funded by Henry Smith Charity, 16 people with dementia and their carers joined a composer, musical director and music students to write a series of songs under the theme “Postcards from Chester”. At the end of the project, they performed these songs – which covered topics including the horse races, the river and the zoo – to family and friends.

This time in our Journey Makers series, we hear from Charlotte Cunningham, artistic director at Turtle Key Arts, and Deborah Thomas, Chester’s local Turtle Song Project co-ordinator, on how the project changes lives, and how community transport is integral to making it all happen.

Charlotte: “It’s not a very positive time in life when you are diagnosed with dementia, so the Turtle Song Project is finally something for people to look forward to.

“People tell us that the best thing about it is simply feeling that they exist, and people noticing when they talk. Music gives them a voice again during a period of life which can be very isolating.

“Families are very moved when they come to see the final performances. The daughter of a performer once told us: ‘I have not seen her smile like that for a long time: today she was my beautiful, intelligent, kind and caring, fun-loving mum again.’

“Over the years, I have been surprised to see a very positive response from people’s carers, too. As well as giving them a bit of respite, the carers find new ways of interacting, and realise the person is still there.

“Without community transport, many people just wouldn’t be able to get to the University campus in order to participate. Public transport isn’t an option for people who have dementia: it’s scary. So the fact that we can provide minibuses with drivers who can support our participants is great, and makes our project so much stronger.

“ECT in Cheshire’s drivers were helpful in every way, and even suggested new participants for the programme. It’s the drivers who are out and about in the community, so they know the vulnerable people, isolated at home, that we want to involve.

“I feel very strongly about community transport – I was a driver in the early days myself at Westway Community Transport in London! Most traditional transport companies would just shrug and say, ‘that’s not my business’, but community transport organisations really care. Once, a participant even composed a lyric about a “patient bus driver” – a reminder of how important community transport is for people who struggle getting about.”

Deborah: “Part of the ethos of the project is to make the people feel as welcome and at home as we can, because working in groups with people you don’t know can be daunting when you are living with dementia. My job involved welcoming them and offering them the nicest chocolate biscuits. I also checked in with people in-between sessions to make sure everything was okay.

“It was these little things that made people’s experiences seamless, and an accommodating transport service was a really important part of that. ECT in Cheshire was so helpful: if I needed someone picking up, I’d just ring.

“Seeing the performance at the end when everyone’s families came was very emotional. The children of those involved were so proud to see their parents doing something productive and creative. So, thank you to ECT in Cheshire for getting people there!”


For more information on the services we provide in Cheshire, please click here.


Categories: Cheshire, Journey Makers

Journey Makers: Brightening up Christmas with the Salvation Army

January 29, 2019

Journey Makers: Brightening up Christmas with the Salvation Army image
Journey Makers: Brightening up Christmas with the Salvation Army

ECT Charity is on a mission to end loneliness and isolation.

We do this by enabling those who are unable to access mainstream transport to venture out of their homes: whether for a shopping trip or doctor’s appointment, or an excursion to the seaside.

There are lots of people who work hard to make these journeys possible. Our Journey Makers series shines a light on them – from our well-trained, caring drivers to the community members who organise transport for local groups.


Every year, Ealing’s Salvation Army aims to tackle loneliness by hosting a Christmas lunch for vulnerable or isolated members of the local community.

On 25th December 2018, Ealing’s Salvation Army welcomed 65 guests and volunteers to enjoy a morning of games and mince pies, followed by a full Christmas lunch and ending with a viewing of the Queen’s speech.

Ealing Community Transport (ECT) has been providing transport for these lunches for many years. This time, an ECT minibus driven by volunteer Linda Bridges, enabled 14 guests who struggle with mobility to attend on Christmas Day.

Today’s Journey Makers story comes from Sarah Oliver, an Ealing Salvation Army officer. She explains how Christmas Day can be extremely lonely for many people, and why the partnership with ECT is so important to the Salvation Army and its volunteers:

Journey Maker Sarah Oliver
Journey Maker Sarah Oliver

“In my role as a Salvation Army officer, I meet people at our groups, such as our Lunch Club for over-55s, who are isolated all year round. However, I think their loneliness is particularly heightened at Christmas: people are more aware that they are on their own and unable to celebrate Christmas the way that they used to when they were younger. It is a time when we are all told to spend time with family and the people that we love, so it emphasises the isolation that people are in.

“The Christmas lunch was run for many years by a lady called Cynthia Alleeson, who also worked as a driver for ECT. Sadly, she passed away just before Christmas last year, so my husband and I have now taken on the role of organising of the lunch.

“It’s a big operation. On Christmas Eve, volunteers come to do all of the preparation, including peeling the vegetables and preparing the turkeys. Then on Christmas Day, we arrive at 8.30am to get the oven on and start preparing for the guests who arrive at 10.30am.

“When I eventually get a chance to sit down and talk to the guests, I can see that all of the hard work has been worth it, because many of them tell me that otherwise they would be on their own with just a sandwich.

“An ECT minibus brought around 14 guests this year. We completely rely on the service, because without it the guests who need assistance getting in and out of vehicles would not have been able to attend at all. We can provide transport for some of the guests, but others require specialist accessible vehicles, which is something we don’t have.

“We get a number of messages and cards afterwards from people who are just so grateful for the Christmas lunch. And this year one guest told me: ‘I have had more conversation today than I have had all week,’ while another said that they ‘couldn’t think of a nicer place to spend Christmas Day’.

“Our volunteers are often very grateful for the experience as well, as, without it, many would be on their own at Christmas too. They come back year after year, and just want to give back.”

Linda Bridges, the ECT driver who provided this year’s door-to-door transport for the lunch said “I really enjoy the day, especially seeing how happy it makes my passengers. Everyone is so grateful, without the transport they would have been at home alone. And I get to see my grandchildren before and after.”


Do you know someone who needs help getting around? Find out more about Ealing Community Transport here.


Categories: Ealing, Journey Makers

Journey Makers: “Skills I learnt with ECT gave me the confidence to take control in an emergency”

January 07, 2019

Journey Makers: “Skills I learnt with ECT gave me the confidence to take control in an emergency” image
Journey Makers: “Skills I learnt with ECT gave me the confidence to take control in an emergency”

ECT Charity is on a mission to end loneliness and isolation.

We do this by enabling those who are unable to access mainstream transport to venture out of their homes: whether for a shopping trip or doctor’s appointment, or an excursion to the seaside.

There are lots of people who work hard to make these journeys possible. Our Journey Makers series shines a light on them – from our well-trained, caring drivers to the community members who organise transport for local groups.


This time, our Journey Maker is Ealing Community Transport (ECT) driver Stuart.

He describes how the skills he acquired on a first aid course, taken as part of his ECT driver training, proved invaluable when he encountered an emergency on the way home from work.

“After a day of driving for ECT had ended, I headed to the supermarket to buy some groceries.

“Walking into the shop, I noticed several people standing over a young lady. She was lying on the ground, and appeared to be having a seizure.

“Immediately, I thought about the emergency response skills I had gained during the first aid course I took as part of my role as an ECT driver.

“Remembering what I had learnt, I placed her in the recovery position. I also spoke to the 999 operators to explain what appeared to be wrong.

“While we waited for an ambulance to arrive, I placed my ECT hi-vis garments under her head, and covered her with my ECT fleece. At this point, there was luckily some additional help from an NHS passenger transport driver, who assisted me with keeping her warm.

“A rapid response vehicle and then an ambulance came within a few minutes, and she was taken inside to be treated in private. The paramedics told me that she was breathing well and her oxygen levels were good.

“Thanks to the skills I learnt on the ECT first aid training course, I felt confident enough to take control of the situation. I am just glad that I was able to assist her before the professionals arrived, and was able to help ensure a positive outcome for her.”


Interested in becoming a member of our team of caring drivers? Find out more here.


Categories: Ealing, Journey Makers

Journey Makers: “We combined forces to tackle loneliness at Christmas”

December 19, 2018

Journey Makers: “We combined forces to tackle loneliness at Christmas” image
Journey Makers: “We combined forces to tackle loneliness at Christmas"

ECT Charity is on a mission to end loneliness and isolation.

We do this by enabling those who are unable to access mainstream transport to venture out of their homes: whether for a shopping trip or doctor’s appointment, or an excursion to the seaside.

There are lots of people who work hard to make these journeys possible. Our Journey Makers series shines a light on them – from our well-trained, caring drivers to the community members who organise transport for local groups.


Ealing Community Transport was full of festive spirit on 16 December, as two of its minibuses took passengers to enjoy an afternoon of festive activities at Acton Fire Station.

Guests were welcomed into a tinsel-covered fire station and offered mince pies and cake by Acton and Chiswick firefighters, a group of Brent cadets and local volunteers.

After a raffle, everyone was invited to sing carols accompanied by a group of string musicians from Street Orchestra Live, an orchestra which plays across a wide range of community spaces, from nursing homes to prisons. To bring the afternoon’s activities to a close, a firefighter dressed up as Santa Claus slid down the station’s firefighters’ pole, and handed out gifts to guests.

This was the fifth tea party organised by Acton’s Red Watch Manager Kim Jerray-Silver, who is this week’s Journey Maker. She started organising regular gatherings to address the high levels of isolation she had witnessed among the elderly people she met on fire safety home visits in the area.

Guests at the parties, many of whom have lived alone since the death of a partner, are invited to socialise, as well as to learn some potentially life-saving fire safety tips.

ECT has partnered with the Acton Fire Station since the tea parties began in 2017, providing transport for the invitees who are unable to use mainstream public transport. As a part of ECT’s Transport Fund, this journey is offered to passengers for free.

Our Journey Maker Kim explains how the partnership with ECT first began:

“After deciding that I would like to hold the tea parties, the next stage was thinking: how am I going to get people here? Most of the people we wanted to invite really struggle with public transport.

“I spoke to Rupa Huq, the MP for Ealing and Acton, about the idea and she mentioned ECT. From there, I got in touch with ECT who said they would love to get involved.

“Five tea parties later, and the partnership has flourished! ECT provides us with two minibuses and two drivers for every tea party for free, and I really don’t know how we would get people there without them.

“I wanted the tea parties to join up different organisations that are all trying to do the same thing: tackle isolation amongst elderly and vulnerable people. Other groups have been involved too, from Neighbourly Care, which invites the guests, to Acton’s Morrisons and a company called DSI Foods which offers sandwiches, tea and coffee.

“As well as creating opportunities to socialise, we also use these events as a chance to educate our guests about fire safety. Statistics show that adults over 65 are twice as likely to die from a fire in a home than any other age group, so at the parties we give some safety advice as well as refer people for home visits from firefighters.

“I have witnessed new friendships being formed. At our Christmas tea party last year, one lady who arrived was so scared that she wouldn’t come past the front door. She was very shy and didn’t open up, however, at our summer party in August she was chatting to all the others and had come out of her shell. You wouldn’t have even recognised her as the same person.

“There’s so much strength in combining forces rather than working separately. We’re hoping to keep arranging at least one tea party per quarter, and we would really struggle without the community transport help. With limited funds, working together makes everything possible.

“Other fire stations have seen what we’re doing and have been inspired to do something similar for the isolated and vulnerable members of their communities – it feels good to be influencing change across the country!”


ECT provides transport for the tea parties through its charitable Transport Fund, established to help organisations in Ealing create social opportunities for isolated individuals. Find out how to apply here.


Categories: Ealing, Journey Makers

Journey Makers: Dorset Community Transport drivers give back this Christmas

December 19, 2018

Journey Makers: Dorset Community Transport drivers give back this Christmas image
Journey Makers: Dorset Community Transport drivers give back this Christmas

ECT Charity is on a mission to end loneliness and isolation.

We do this by enabling those who are unable to access mainstream transport to venture out of their homes: whether for a shopping trip or doctor’s appointment, or an excursion to the seaside.

There are lots of people who work hard to make these journeys possible. Our Journey Makers series shines a light on them – from our well-trained, caring drivers to the community members who organise transport for local groups.


Like the elves in Santa’s workshop, Dorset Community Transport’s drivers have been hard at work this December. From lunches held at social clubs and golf clubs, to pantomimes in Yeovil and Weymouth, our drivers have been transporting passengers to over 14 different festive destinations across the region.

The outings enabled passengers – many of whom struggle with mobility and have little or no access to public transport – to leave their homes and experience some Christmas magic this December.

This week’s Journey Makers are our DCT drivers. We spoke to some of them after their trips to hear what it is like to be a driver during the festive period.

Louis Minchella

Louis became a DCT driver earlier this year. He had retired from the fire service and was in search of a way to continue being useful to his community. The best part of his job, he says, is helping to keep those who live in rural and isolated areas of Dorset connected, many of whom he says are very lonely.

This December, he took passengers to Winchester’s Christmas Market, as well as trips to two different garden centres hosting festive displays.

Louis told us: “The groups have great fun on the trips, and they always come back jolly. At this time of year the garden centres are very Christmassy: there are lights, decorations and even singing reindeer. Many of the passengers are lonely, so sometimes the best part of the day for them is just having a cup of tea with friends.

“Where we live is very rural. There are two buses through town but nothing through the villages. Nothing at all. There’s lots of social isolation and loneliness, because even if people can drive, they are nervous about doing so.

“I love living in a rural place, but there is a serious downside to it when you get older. Young families often move to urban areas where there are more job opportunities than in rural places like this. This means that their older relatives can’t get out and about without the support of organisations like DCT.

“If a passenger gets off after a journey, smiles and says, ‘Thank you very much, I have had a cracking day,’ that really drives home that what I’m doing is so worthwhile.”

Alan Crane

Singing for residents in Spetisbury
Singing for residents in Spetisbury

After taking a year’s break from work and travelling to New Zealand, Alan felt he had more to give, but did not want to go back to his career in retail. He decided to become a driver for DCT, a job which he has now had for four years, and says is made especially enjoyable thanks to being part of a “great team”.

This winter, Alan took passengers to several festive destinations, such as Galton Garden Centre in Owermoigne, a pantomime in Weymouth and an East Stour pub for Christmas dinner. He even drove a group of school children to a nursing home in Spetisbury where they sang for residents.

He said: “The passengers love where we go and the things we do. They are isolated, and for some of them it makes their whole Christmas, whether it’s seeing a funny laughing Santa, singing penguins at a garden centre or just having a chat to others.

“You get to know the passengers very well, and there are some real characters. It’s fun hearing where people have come from. Today, I met a lady whose husband was a British ambassador and she has lived everywhere from Venezuela to Peru. People relate to me as a son, and we love sharing stories. One group has even invited me to join their Christmas dinner this afternoon to thank me for driving them this year!

“Dorset is very rural. We don’t have trains, and now we don’t even have buses. So community transport is an absolute lifeline for most of our passengers. There is a scheme called Bus2Go that links up lonely people with each other and encourages them to get out on bus trips – we have been providing the transport for that too.”

Jeffrey Latimer

These days, Jeffrey works in the DCT office helping with the organisation of these trips, but he still occasionally drives, and this year took passengers out to the pantomime. He told us:

“It was wonderful taking a group to the panto this year, and to see people out with their friends. Everyone was really excited.

“Although I work in the office now, I still help out with driving when I can because I enjoy meeting people, and it gives me a great sense of satisfaction to be able to help. The predominant message we get from passengers is that they are so grateful.”

Rodney Bush

Rodney applied to work for DCT a few years ago because he always enjoyed driving and liked interacting with both older and younger people. This December, he took a group out to a Christmas lunch hosted at Stewarts Garden Centre in Christchurch.

Rodney said: “The group I took to Christmas lunch this year live in self-contained little flats adjoining each other. They meet up for their meals and have a warden that keeps an eye on things.

“They’re a jovial bunch, and I take them out about once a month or so. This year they enjoyed their trip out to lunch, and all said how good the food was. They also managed to pop across the road for some shopping at the supermarket, which gave them a chance to buy some festive knick-knacks.

“The best feedback I have ever had was from the organiser at a care home who said that because I had been so kind to the residents, they would ask for me to be their driver again! I don’t usually tell people these sorts of things, but that was a good feeling.”

Simon Baxter

After injuring his back, Simon was forced to end his career in gardening and forestry. Luckily, he could still drive, and he applied for a job at DCT earlier this year because he enjoys meeting people of all ages.

This winter, Simon drove to two separate festive events: he took a group of children with special educational needs from Mountjoy School to a carol service, and he took passengers to a Christmas party organised by a charity supporting disabled people in Dorchester.

He said: “It’s nice to feel like you’re giving back to the community, and I enjoy meeting different groups of people from across the region. The Christmas party I drove to this year was packed, and everyone seemed to really enjoy themselves. The children at the carol service also had a wonderful time.

“If it weren’t for DCT, I don’t know what our passengers would do. Public bus services in Dorset are being cut left, right and centre, so people have no other way of getting out.”

Kevin Vipas

Kevin has been a DCT driver for six years, a role which he decided to take on to keep him active after retiring from his previous career. This year, he drove two different groups to Winchester Christmas Market.

He said: “Yesterday we took two buses to the market, and there were 29 of us in the end. Some people come back with lots of packages and others with nothing, but for most people it’s just a chance to get out.

“I recently found out that one of the ladies in the group hadn’t been out of the house for two and a half years after becoming partially sighted and losing her confidence. However, she started coming out with a social group that regularly uses DCT, and it’s remarkable to see her transformation from someone who wouldn’t say boo to a goose, to joining
in with all of the chat.

“It is very rewarding to see older people enjoying themselves, and everyone is always very thankful when they get off the bus.”


For more information on the services we provide in Dorset, please click here.


Categories: Dorset, Journey Makers

ECT in Cheshire’s recipe for a less lonely winter

December 19, 2018

ECT in Cheshire’s recipe for a less lonely winter image
ECT in Cheshire's recipe for a less lonely winter

This December, ECT in Cheshire passengers were offered day trips to a range of festive destinations across the region.

From Christmas shopping in Bury Market and Bents Garden & Home Store, to a scenic trip to the beautiful North Wales town of Llangollen, the day trips were a chance for people to enjoy themselves and make friends, safe in the care of our highly trained drivers.

ECT in Cheshire provided these day trips for free to registered PlusBus users, as part of its charitable activities and benefit to the community. The outings meant a less lonely winter for passengers this year, many of whom struggle to leave the house independently, particularly in cold weather.

We talked to some of the passengers after their day trips, and devised this recipe for a less lonely winter:

Take one portion of friendship…

The day trips enabled passengers – many of whom live in isolation – to see old friends, as well as make new ones.

Speaking on behalf of her brother Mark, who is a regular PlusBus passenger and who went on the trip to Bents Garden & Home Store, Pauline Linegar said:

“Mark used to use taxis, but I always worried that he was on his own. With the day trips, I know that he is safe with the caring staff, as well as being with his friends on the bus.

“It’s nice to know that he isn’t alone, especially at Christmas time. I know he really enjoyed his trip to the Bents Garden centre.”

… and mix in mobility…

For those who find mainstream public transport challenging, it can be tempting to stay indoors over the festive period. The day trips enabled passengers to get out and socialise without worry.

Mr Hayes said: “Without ECT’s service, I would be able to go hardly anywhere. But this year I went to scenic Llangollen and enjoyed it very much. This bus is godsend for me – so thank you, ECT.”

John Hubbard, who joined one of the Bents Garden centre trips, said: “I have a disability and no car, so I struggle to get out of town. The day trip enabled me to travel further than I usually can this Christmas.”

… add care…

ECT in Cheshire’s caring drivers ensured all passengers felt looked after when they left their homes this winter.

Mrs Hackney, who went on the Bury Market and Bents Garden centre trips, said: “Your day trips are great. I use a wheelchair and am made to feel very safe on the bus, thanks to the helpful drivers.”

John Hubbard added: “What a nice bunch of people the drivers are! Not only are they helpful, but they are very kind indeed.”

… sprinkle on independence…

The day trips were a chance for passengers, many of whom have to rely on family or friends to help them get out of their homes, to regain some independence this winter. Some even managed to do some Christmas shopping!

Mrs King said: “The trip to Bury Market was wonderful. I would struggle to get there without these trips and it was very enjoyable.”

Hillary Hall, who went on both Bury Market and Bents Garden centre trips, said: “I managed to pick up some bargains on our trip to the market!”

… and don’t forget the fun!

Pauline Linegar added: “The driver Michelle was excellent and made everyone welcome. It was such fun spending time with everyone on the bus, as well as having all the buses travelling together in convoy. Both Mark and I are looking forward to ECT’s next round of day trips!”


The day trips were free to Cheshire’s existing and new PlusBus users. If you or someone you know needs help getting about, you can find out more about the PlusBus service here.

You can read the leaflet for our Winter 2018 day trips here. We will provide information on the next series of day trips in due course!


Categories: Day trips, Cheshire

PlusBus for Health boosts care and combats loneliness for the most isolated people in Ealing

December 05, 2018

PlusBus for Health boosts care and combats loneliness for the most isolated people in Ealing image
PlusBus for Health boosts care and combats loneliness for the most isolated people in Ealing

New research published this week demonstrates that Ealing Community Transport’s PlusBus for Health service vastly reduces the need for GP home visits, lowers the rate of missed appointments and improves the care that elderly people receive. It also plays an important role in combating loneliness in the London Borough of Ealing.

PlusBus for Health is a door-to-door service that enables isolated older and disabled people to travel between their homes and GP surgeries. It is funded by Ealing Clinical Commissioning Group and is free for GPs and patients to use. The service began in April 2017 following a successful two-year pilot.

The research also demonstrates that in 2017/18, every £1 spent on PlusBus for Health generated a social value of £1.22.

Dr Mohini Parmar, Chair of Ealing Clinical Commissioning Group, said: “In Ealing, we are taking steps to tackle social isolation, which is often a problem for our older and disabled residents. We are also taking action to reduce the number of people who miss their GP appointments, and need home visits in the borough.”

She added: “The PlusBus for Health community transport service delivers on both of these ambitions and we have been really pleased to see the service benefit so many of our residents since its launch.”

Targeting the most isolated

As the Prime Minister, Theresa May, pointed out when she launched the government’s loneliness strategy in October: “Loneliness sits alongside childhood obesity and mental wellbeing as one of the greatest public health challenges of our time.”

At Ealing Community Transport (ECT), we have been highlighting the strong link between loneliness and ill health for many years. Our community transport services give isolated people the opportunity not only to get where they need to go, but also to chat and socialise with fellow passengers on their journey.

The research into the impact of PlusBus for Health demonstrates that it is really reaching out to the most frail and isolated people in our community – 62% of passengers are over 80 years old, and eligible passengers have limited transport support from family and friends to help them attend appointments.

The research shows that PlusBus for Health improves the wellbeing of its passengers and helps them beat loneliness.

Mollie Evett is just one example of the many elderly people who have had their lives transformed by PlusBus for Health. Mollie is 84 years old, lives alone and has difficulty walking. She uses PlusBus for Health to get to her GP surgery and, after being told about ECT’s PlusBus service too, she now uses that to get to the supermarket.

She told us: “ECT are fantastic; I can’t live without them. The drivers are lovely, we get to know them and have chats with them and a joke. That sort of fun keeps you going.”

Improving the health service

PlusBus for Health is helping its passengers receive better care. The research found that PlusBus for Health reduced by more than two-thirds the amount of appointments that elderly people missed, and nearly halved the home visits that GPs had to make.

This means that patients receive better quality care because having appointments at the surgery enables doctors and nurses to spend more time with their patients. It also gives the medical professionals access to the specialist equipment they need for tests which aren’t available in people’s homes.

Furiha Chaudry, practice manager at Gordon House Surgery in Ealing, explained that her surgery now runs more efficiently as GPs and nursing staff don’t spend so much time travelling to see patients. She said: “Instead of having 10 home visits a day, we now have up to 10 a week. And we’ve had good feedback from patients too.”

Sharing our story

ECT’s CEO, Anna Whitty MBE, emphasised that the purpose of highlighting the strengths of the service was to encourage more surgeries in Ealing to make fuller use of it, and to inspire other communities to explore developing similar services.

She added: “PlusBus for Health is a big success and we are proud of our partnership with Ealing Clinical Commissioning Group. Our new research is testimony to its benefits, the savings it brings to the NHS and the social value that it creates.”


You can read more about PlusBus for Health in our ‘Special Focus’ publication, which you can see here.

Read the PlusBus for Health Impact Evaluation here.

If you run a surgery and would like more information on using PlusBus for Health for your patients, call us on 020 8813 3214.


Categories: Ealing

Journey Makers: “Without DCT, I’m not sure how my mother-in-law would have travelled from hospital to her care home”

November 23, 2018

Journey Makers: “Without DCT, I’m not sure how my mother-in-law would have travelled from hospital to her care home” image
Ginette with her son Alan

ECT Charity is on a mission to end loneliness and isolation.

We do this by enabling those who are unable to access mainstream transport to venture out of their homes: whether for a shopping trip or doctor’s appointment, or an excursion to the seaside.

There are lots of people who work hard to make these journeys possible. Our Journey Makers series shines a light on them – from our well-trained, caring drivers to the community members who organise transport for local groups.


This time we hear from Journey Maker Suzi, who discovered that finding suitable transport to take her mother-in-law Ginette from Bournemouth to Devon, was no easy task.

Ginette had recently broken her leg, meaning that, as well as requiring a wheelchair, she would need extra support when getting in and out of a vehicle. Suzi had contacted various local transport services, but none were able to help.

Eventually, she made the journey possible by contacting Dorset Community Transport (DCT).

DCT, which is part of ECT Charity, not only provided a suitable vehicle for Ginette and her wheelchair, but also a driver trained in caring for passengers with a range of mobility difficulties.

Stories like these demonstrate that it is often organisations like Dorset Community Transport which step in when individuals slip the net of statutory provision. Suzi explains:

“I was struggling to find transport for my mother-in-law, who was being discharged from an NHS facility in Bournemouth and moving to a care home in Devon, to be nearer to her family.

“She had broken her leg badly and needed the assistance of at least two people to be transferred anywhere. Taking her in my car was not an option, as I am a part-time wheelchair user and would not have been able to assist in supporting her.

“I contacted various transport providers but was having no luck. My mother-in-law was not entitled to an NHS ambulance because the journey would be inter-county, and while my local transport organisation did have suitable vehicles, they couldn’t provide a driver to assist.

“In the end, I gave Dorset Community Transport a call, who thankfully were able to help us. I was told that we could be provided with a wheelchair-friendly vehicle, as well as a driver who could help her get in and out.

“I am not sure how we would have got my mother-in-law to Devon otherwise. It was a brilliant service, and I am extremely grateful for their help.”

Photo: Ginette with her son Alan.


Do you know someone who needs help getting around? Find out more about Dorset Community Transport here.


Categories: Dorset, Journey Makers

ECT helps Royal British Legion members pay their respects on Remembrance Sunday

November 12, 2018

ECT helps Royal British Legion members pay their respects on Remembrance Sunday image
ECT helps Royal British Legion members pay their respects on Remembrance Sunday

From a six-year-old Brownie in wellies to a proud Second World War veteran displaying their medals, Greenford’s parade on Remembrance Sunday brought everyone in the local community together.

But while most people are able to join the annual walk to the war memorial outside Greenford Hall on 11 November, many Royal British Legion members now struggle to join in, as age and infirmity limit their mobility.

This year, however, determined volunteers from Ealing Community Transport (ECT) ensured that age and infirmity were no longer barriers for people who wished to honour fallen comrades, or pay their respects to those who have lost their lives in service of their country.

As the hundreds of veterans, cadets, Guides, Scouts and military personnel marched in time to the beat of various military bands, a bright green minibus could be seen joining the parade, which this year also marked the First World War Centenary.

Provided by ECT – a charity which enables those who struggle with mainstream transport to get out and about – the minibus was arranged thanks to Nick Hilton, a member of the ECT operations team and a committee member of the Royal British Legion Club in Greenford.

In recent years, Nick had been struck by the disappointment expressed by those who could no longer take part in the parade. He said: “Remembrance Sunday is a big deal to British Legion members. For some people, it is just a walk. But for our members, it is so much more.

“During my time at the Royal British Legion Club, I have seen able elders grow less able to do the things that they love to do, including joining the Remembrance parade. So, ECT driver Mandy Golby and I came up with the idea of partnering with ECT to provide a minibus, and I am proud that mobility is no longer a barrier for those who want to show their respects.”

Feedback from the passengers has been overwhelmingly positive. Nick said: “One of the veterans told me it was ‘just like the old days, with everyone back together again’. This is about people being able to get together and be where they really want to be, instead of being isolated alone.

“Everybody that wishes to pay their respects to the fallen forces should be entitled to do so, regardless of disability or mobility issues. To have been able to help people on the First World War Centenary was priceless.”


Know someone who needs help getting about? Find out how they can travel with our PlusBus service here.


Categories: Ealing

Journey Makers: “Drivers are often first to know if something isn’t quite right with a passenger”

November 02, 2018

Journey Makers: “Drivers are often first to know if something isn’t quite right with a passenger” image
Journey Makers: “Drivers often first to know if something isn’t quite right with a passenger”

ECT Charity is on a mission to end loneliness and isolation.

We do this by enabling those who are unable to access mainstream transport to venture out of their homes: whether for a shopping trip or doctor’s appointment, or an excursion to the seaside.

There are lots of people who work hard to make these journeys possible. Our Journey Makers series shines a light on them – from our well-trained, caring drivers to the community members who organise transport for local groups.


ECT in Cheshire’s PlusBus driver Alan raised the alarm after one of his regular passengers didn’t appear for his usual shopping trip. As Alan’s story illustrates, PlusBus drivers don’t simply transport people from A to B, but they also play a key role in caring for our elderly and disabled passengers.

When regular Wednesday passenger Bert did not appear at the door for his usual shopping trip to Ellesmere Port, PlusBus driver Alan was puzzled. Bert was one of the passengers who would always let the ECT in Cheshire team know if he wasn’t going to be on the bus that day.

Feeling that something might not be quite right, Alan decided to go around to the back of Bert’s house to investigate. Through the kitchen window, he could see a shape on the floor.

Alan realised it was Bert, in obvious distress. He tried to open all of Bert’s doors and windows, but they were locked. He immediately rang the team at the office, who contacted the police and ambulance services. He also shouted through the door to Bert that help was on its way.

Alan’s manager soon arrived to oversee the situation so that Alan could continue on his route, as he still had a passenger on the bus and another to pick up.

A few hours later, Alan received a phone call explaining what had happened to Bert. He had fallen in the kitchen just before going to bed the night before and broken his hip. He had been unable to move for nearly 12 hours.

The paramedics said that without Alan’s instinct that something was wrong, and taking the initiative to check the back door, Bert could have been there a lot longer – with potentially dire consequences.

Alan’s colleagues have said that the way in which he dealt with this incident, is typical of the care and consideration he has always shown his passengers. Bert’s family got in touch to explain how thankful they were for his quick reactions and care shown in this difficult situation.


Categories: Cheshire, Journey Makers

ECT Charity’s CEO Anna Whitty named in exclusive ‘WISE100’ list of top female social entrepreneurs

October 31, 2018

ECT Charity’s CEO Anna Whitty named in exclusive ‘WISE100’ list of top female social entrepreneurs image
ECT Charity CEO named in ‘WISE100’ list of top female social entrepreneurs

Anna Whitty, ECT Charity’s CEO, has been recognised as a ‘leading woman’ in the social enterprise sector, for the second year running.

The NatWest WISE100 (Women in Social Enterprise 100) shines a spotlight on women across the UK who are leading the way in social enterprise, impact investment and mission-driven business.

Now in its second year, the list of high achievers – produced annually by Pioneers Post magazine in partnership with NatWest bank – was revealed at an evening celebration in central London on 29th October 2018.

Having appeared on the inaugural WISE100 list in 2017, Anna was amongst just 18 other women who had been nominated in both 2017 and 2018. Also amongst on this exclusive group were the CEOs of leading social enterprises Belu Water, Acumen CIC and Homes for Good.

In addition to bringing a strong female voice to the male-dominated transport industry, Anna’s nomination this year highlighted her innovation and leadership in the creation of Measuring Up: The CT Social Value Toolkit. This ground-breaking report on the social value of community transport, enables community transport organisations to prove their value to their stakeholders for the very first time. Read more about this Toolkit here.

Taking place at Coutts on The Strand, the WISE100 names were revealed at an event focusing on the theme of ‘sharing the stage’. Speakers throughout the evening spoke about the responsibility of women in leadership positions to help other women build their careers, and about the need to create a more diverse social enterprise sector for the future.

Anna Whitty said: “It was an honour to be acknowledged among so many successful women at this year’s WISE100 event. The theme of ‘sharing the stage’ particularly resonates with me and the work I do at ECT Charity, as I have always participated in mentoring young female social entrepreneurs and taken an interest in furthering female leadership in social enterprise.”

Find a link to this year’s full list here.


Categories: ECT Charity

Journey Makers: “The joy given by our Hyde Park trip was clear to see”

October 23, 2018

Journey Makers: “The joy given by our Hyde Park trip was clear to see” image
One of the ECT minibuses in front of Christo's The Mastaba sculpture in Hyde Park

ECT Charity is on a mission to end loneliness and isolation.

We do this by enabling those who are unable to access mainstream transport to venture out of their homes: whether for a shopping trip or doctor’s appointment, or an excursion to the seaside.

There are lots of people who work hard to make these journeys possible. Our Journey Makers series shines a light on them – from our well-trained, caring drivers to the community members who organise transport for local groups.


Ealing driver John O’Rourke describes a trip to Hyde Park with a group of residents from Southall’s Martin House care home.

“As an Ealing Community Transport driver, I never know what each day is going to bring. I might be visiting a doctor’s surgery, picking someone up from Morrisons on our PlusBus door-to-door service, off to Kew Gardens on a group transport trip, or simply taking a bus for a wash! What I can be sure of is that most days are different.

“So it was all change again when I was asked to take residents from Martin House care home in Southall to Hyde Park for the afternoon. The group was booked on a tour of the park on electric buggies, courtesy of Liberty Drives, which provides free transport within Hyde Park for people with mobility difficulties. All of the electric buggies were accessible with ramps and clamps, which ensured the passengers could be taken safely around the park.

“Unexpectedly, I was also invited to join the tour. So once everyone was loaded onto the buggies, off we went! The whole trip lasted about an hour. I thought I knew Hyde Park well, but I got to see parts I’d never seen before, including the Italian gardens and the Rolls Royce ice cream van. The buggies felt quite fast at times, but we all hung on tight and enjoyed the ride.

“I didn’t know these buggies existed, but the service and care shown was excellent. A few people on my bus said they hadn’t been outside for a while but had really enjoyed the trip. They clearly had a great afternoon. I know these events take time and expense to organise, but the joy this one hour on an electric buggy gave to these people (including me!) was clear to see. In my opinion, it was priceless.”



Categories: Day trips, Ealing, Journey Makers

Why we’re all about “making journeys possible”

October 17, 2018

Why we’re all about “making journeys possible” image
Why we’re all about “making journeys possible”

ECT Charity’s focus is on helping isolated people get out and about. CEO Anna Whitty explains how.

On the eve of our 40th anniversary, we have been considering how best to express what we do. After reviewing our vision, mission and values, we wanted to create a new phrase for the organisation which we as staff and volunteers all relate to, and one which succinctly captures why we exist and what we want to achieve.

Going forward, you’ll often see “making journeys possible” below our logo. This new strapline is a true reflection of what we as an organisation are all about.

“Making journeys possible” embodies the social value that we create every day. We do this by enabling those people who struggle to access mainstream transport to lead active and independent lives.

We focus on helping those people who fall between the gaps of statutory transport provision, those who are isolated in rural areas, and those who are lonely because they struggle to leave their homes using conventional transport. Community transport is much more than taking passengers from A to B; we take them to new places, help them stay healthy and make new friends.

I’m sure that this new strapline will resonate very well with passengers, whether they live in urban Ealing or rural Dorset. They often tell us that community transport is a “godsend” and a “lifeline” and that it helps them lead lives that they thought might not be otherwise possible due to mobility or other difficulties, or because local transport services have been cut from their area.

Recent conversations with passengers on our Cheshire summer day trips illustrate how we help people enjoy their lives by taking them on days out to the seaside, to garden centres and cities – places some of them thought they might never have the opportunity to see again.

Our upcoming “Journey Makers” series is a collection of stories which will shine a light on the people who are “making journeys possible” for passengers every day. We will hear from drivers, volunteers, carers, staff and organisers, all of whom provide that extra care which sets community transport apart.

We hope you enjoy it!

Anna Whitty, CEO, ECT Charity


Categories: ECT Charity, Journey Makers

Five reasons why community transport mattered to our passengers this summer

September 28, 2018

Five reasons why community transport mattered to our passengers this summer image
Cheshire passengers formed new friendships on our day trips this summer

This summer, our regular ECT in Cheshire passengers were offered day trips to eight destinations across the region, including the North Wales coast and Liverpool city centre as well as a local garden centre and shopping outlet.

Free to existing PlusBus users, the day trips were a chance for passengers to meet new people and visit places many had never been to before.

We talked to our passengers after the outings and discovered five key reasons why these day trips are so important to them.

ECT in Cheshire passengers went on a summer day trip and…

1. ...Felt safe

Wales trip

For the elderly or those with restricted mobility, making trips out of the house can be daunting, especially without a family member or carer for support. ECT Charity’s drivers are highly trained in caring for those with varying mobility needs, meaning passengers can feel at ease when travelling away from home.

Mrs Colocott told us: “The day trips are fantastic. I have difficulty walking and can’t manage the normal commercial day trips where you are dropped off in one place for hours until the return. With the PlusBus trip I know I will be with friends and that the driver is only a phone call away in case of any problems.”

Mrs Short said: “The day trips are a godsend for people like me who would have no way of getting out and about to places like Llandudno and Tweedmill. I know from previous use of the PlusBus that even though I am miles from home I would feel safe and supported if I needed help. You just don’t get that from other transport companies.”

2. ...Saw new places

Wales trip

The day trips this year took passengers to places they had never seen before, as well as locations that many would struggle to visit independently.

One of the passengers, Mrs Quelch, told us how it felt: “There is no way I could go to places like Llandudno anymore and to actually be driven around the Great Orme was simply stunning. I have never seen such beautiful views before.”

3. ...Made new friends

Wales trip

On this year’s day trips, passengers spent time socialising and making new friends.

Mrs Hewitt, who usually uses the service to go on shopping trips, said: “The day trips are wonderful. I am always meeting new people, some of whom are now friends, and we regularly use the PlusBus to meet up together, which we simply couldn’t do without the PlusBus.

“I met a lady on one trip who I had never met before. She needed a bit of help getting around Llandudno as her friend had cancelled, so we helped her during the day and have now become firm friends.”

4. ...Remained mobile

Wales trip

With specialised vehicles and staff trained to care for vulnerable passengers, ECT in Cheshire enables passengers to travel independently, in spite of their mobility challenges.

After this year’s day trip to the North Wales coast, Mr Hayes said: “If I’m having a bad day with my walking I know I can bring my walker, removing any concerns about being able to get about and not being stuck in one place. Thanks to the day trips I’m now going to places I’ve never even heard of, but I know if it’s on the list it’ll be something I’ll enjoy.”

5. ...Were not forgotten

Wales trip

Elderly people can often feel lonely and isolated from the community around them. ECT Charity programmes such as these day trips enable our passengers to leave their homes and meet new people from their local area.

Mrs King, who normally uses the ECT PlusBus service for going out to bingo, told us: “The whole concept of the day trips is brilliant, and makes us feel as if we aren’t forgotten about after all.”




Categories: Day trips, Cheshire

ECT Charity makes the UK Social Enterprise Awards shortlist

September 03, 2018

ECT Charity makes the UK Social Enterprise Awards shortlist image
Ealing passengers have a chat with their driver on their journey to an Age UK community group.

ECT Charity is pleased to announce that it has been shortlisted for this year’s UK Social Enterprise Awards. Run by Social Enterprise UK (SEUK), the Awards highlight impactful work of social ventures from across the country.

ECT Charity joins five other organisations in the ‘Prove it: Social Impact’ category, which showcases enterprises that can “truly demonstrate their impact with their stakeholders”. Winners from each category will be revealed at an Awards ceremony taking place in November.

Selected from over 30 applicants for the category, ECT Charity’s application for the Awards highlighted not only the value it creates for communities through providing affordable and accessible transport, but its work towards enabling the community transport sector as a whole to measure its social impact and social value.

Anna Whitty, CEO at ECT Charity, said: “We are thrilled to have been chosen amongst 30 other applicants for the category, and to be listed among some of the UK’s most inspiring impactful organisations.

“We hope making the shortlist will be an opportunity for ECT to promote our social mission of ending social isolation through community transport, as well as raising awareness of our recently launched social value Toolkit – which enables community transport organisations to demonstrate the value of their work.”

You can find the full shortlist for 2018 here.


Categories: ECT Charity

Bags of help for Dorset Community Transport

August 19, 2018

Bags of help for Dorset Community Transport image
Thorncombe bus users receive their grant from Tesco

Local shoppers have given ‘bags of support’ to one of Dorset Community Transport (DCT)’s vital transport routes.

Between May and June, customers at Chard Tesco could vote for the Thorncombe weekly bus service, alongside two other community groups, to receive support through the store’s ‘Bags of Help’ scheme.

The three groups – which also included Zem Carnival Club and Somerset visually impaired cricket club – will each receive a grant from the scheme.

Members of the Thorncombe and villages bus users and supporters, who received £2,000 from the scheme, have for the past four years worked together with DCT to ensure vital bus routes into local towns keep going, in spite of multiple council funding cuts.

Locals can currently catch one of DCT’s signature “little green buses” on either the Service 14 from Thorncombe to Chard or Service 688 to Axminster via Hawkchurch on Thursdays. DCT also runs a specialised door-to-door PlusBus service for individuals who struggle to access transport to get to Bridport on market day.

For many Thorncombe residents, these buses are their only route to access basic necessities or visit friends and family. Since 2014 their existence has been threatened by county council cuts to public transport across Dorset, with a particularly large public transport cut of £500,000 in April 2016. This resulted in DCT taking on some of the services, providing a lifeline to many local residents.

Tim Christian, General Manager at DCT, says the support of the community has been key in keeping routes alive, in particular Parish Councillor David Marsh.

Mr Christian said: “David first contacted us in 2014, identifying a pressing need for community transport in Thorncombe and its neighbouring parishes. He was concerned that residents would have been left without any means of local transport, and to this day he has played a crucial role as a point of contact with bus users.

“David and the Thorncombe community were delighted to receive the Tesco grant, which will support the future continuation of the route.”

Tesco encourages its customers to bring their own reusable bags to its stores, however the scheme works by allowing customers to choose a donation towards one of three local projects when they need to buy a Bag for Life.

Tesco Community Manager Nicky Halsey said they were “proud to support the community in this way”, and added: “should anyone have a project that would benefit the local community and they could use a financial grant from us they need to apply online.”


For Service 14 and 688 timetables, as well as information on the door-to-door PlusBus service, please click here.


Categories: Dorset

A royal outing for St David’s Care Home passengers

July 03, 2018

A royal outing for St David’s Care Home passengers image
Violet, Paul and Kenneth at the Not Forgotten Association’s royal garden party at Buckingham Palace

Thanks to Ealing Community Transport (ECT), three Ealing war veterans attended a royal garden party at Buckingham Palace hosted by Princess Anne where they joined hundreds of other service personnel to be honoured for their service to their country.

Earlier this month, an ECT driver picked up the three veterans Violet, Paul and Kenneth from St David’s Home in Ealing. They enjoyed a delicious lunch, explored Buckingham Palace gardens and had the opportunity to meet other veterans and celebrities.

Organised by the Not Forgotten Association, the event brought together 2,500 war pensioners and service personnel of all ages with their carers and family members. It is an annual event for the association, which provides holidays, outings and leisure support for service personnel and veterans who are wounded or who have disabilities.

John O’Rourke, ECT’s driver on the day, described his experience:

I’d driven around Buckingham Palace on many occasions but never into the Palace, so it was with some excitement that I drove my bus with passengers from St David’s Home through the Palace gates.

“At this point, I hadn’t realised that I was also invited. So I buttoned up my ECT signature yellow polo shirt and walked on into one of the grandest events I have ever attended.

“There were five of us in our party: three veterans, including two wheelchair users, a family member and a carer who were made to feel welcome from the moment they left the bus. On our way in we stopped to chat with Beefeaters and posed for pictures with them. After a fabulous buffet, including cucumber sandwiches, we were free to explore the royal gardens to the tune of a royal band – along with a smattering of celebrities, not to mention Princess Anne!

“I felt extremely lucky to have been able to attend, and it was wonderful to see the men and women who are proud to have served their country being honoured with this opportunity: it is one they will never forget.

Jackie, who accompanied her father Kenneth, told us:

“It was truly a pleasure and privilege to be there amongst service men and women young and old who have served their country over the years – just an amazing day.

“The visit to Buckingham Palace was a way of saying thank you to people who have made this country a better place. There was a mutual respect between the generations, each acknowledged and recognised.

“It was particularly touching to see young veterans who had lost limbs in recent conflicts helping lift my father’s wheelchair over the steps.

“John was absolutely brilliant, he added to the day and was very much part of our group rather than just a driver. We can’t thank him enough, and without ECT’s specialist vehicle we could have never got there. Thank you.”


Categories: Day trips, Ealing

We’re all going on a summer day trip! ECT in Cheshire offers free travel to favourite destinations

June 29, 2018

We’re all going on a summer day trip! ECT in Cheshire offers free travel to favourite destinations image
ECT in Cheshire’s bright green minibuses will be out and about in the summer sun to end social isolation.

From July to September, ECT in Cheshire is offering a selection of free day trips for residents who find it difficult to get out and about in Chester, Ellesmere Port and Neston. Passengers will be picked up right from their door and taken to a range of destinations including the Bridgemere and Bents garden centres, Liverpool’s Docklands and the coast of North Wales.

We welcome all those who are over 80 or struggle with mobility to sign up for any of the free outings through its PlusBus service. All vehicles are fully wheelchair-accessible, with drivers trained to make the journey as seamless as possible. Passengers can bring a carer if they require one.

The trips offer a chance to socialise for many who live in isolation. As part of our charitable activities and community benefit, the journeys are free of charge to the charity’s existing PlusBus service users, as well as new members who would like to sign up to the service.

Irene, a passenger who travelled to Tweedmill Shopping Outlet on a trip with ECT in Cheshire, said: “We had a nice ride there, the shopping was lovely and the café was really nice.” While Angela, who went on a trip to Liverpool, added: “I enjoyed the trip and met some lovely people.”

Ian Dibbert, General Manager at ECT in Cheshire, commented: “We know that our passengers love the opportunity to get to places that they wouldn’t usually be able to visit and that a day out with friends can be a great lift to the spirits.

“Even if one of the passengers doesn’t know anyone at the start of the trip, they’ll have had lots of opportunities to chat to other people throughout the day and may even have forged some new friendships.

“I look forward to welcoming back our regulars as well as greeting some new faces over the coming months. We’ve been to all of the destinations on this year’s programme before and we know that there are some firm favourites. Book now to avoid disappointment!”


For a full list of the destinations, click here.

To book a place on one of the trips, please call 0151 357 4420.


Categories: Day trips, Cheshire

“We know the immense value of community transport”: MPs’ warm words for community transport

May 22, 2018

“We know the immense value of community transport”: MPs’ warm words for community transport image
Lilian Greenwood MP, the chair of the House of Commons Transport Select Committee

ECT Charity was delighted to see MPs from across the political divide and from all over the UK united in their support for community transport earlier this month.

On Thursday 10 May, a debate took place in Parliament about the future of community transport. Members of Parliament discussed the Department for Transport’s proposed reforms of the legal operating system for community transport which, in our view, is an enormous threat to the future of our services and those of hundreds of other community transport charities across the country.

During the 90-minute debate in Westminster Hall, many MPs expressed their admiration for the work that community transport does. Speakers included the Father of the House and former Chancellor of the Exchequer Kenneth Clarke, Liberal Democrat party leader Sir Vince Cable and former transport secretary Sir Patrick McLoughlin.

Lilian Greenwood, the chair of the House of Commons Transport Select Committee, who called the debate, said at its conclusion: “There cannot be many issues that unite the Father of the House, the leader of the Liberal Democrats, a Conservative former Secretary of State for Transport, three Select Committee chairs, the Scottish National Party and Labour spokespeople and so many other learned honourable members.”

She added: “We know the immense value of community transport. It meets unmet need, generates social value and provides a lifeline to people who may otherwise be cut off from friends, family, work, education, social activities and essential appointments due to disability or geography.”

Highlighting our views to government

At ECT Charity we have recently been working hard to prepare and submit our response to the Department for Transport’s consultation on the reforms which closed on 4 May. This consultation follows many months of uncertainty for the community transport sector after the Department for Transport issued a letter to operators stating that many of us would have to operate under a different legal regime if we were running some types of public service contracts. (You can read more about the background to the current situation here.)

The proposed reforms stem from a reinterpretation made by the Department for Transport of a European law in effect since 2011. We pointed out in our response to the Department for Transport’s consultation that we believe that this reinterpretation of the law is incorrect.

We emphasised in our response that like many other community transport organisations around the UK, if we were unable to tender for contracts using the current permit system, all charitable community transport activities would stop or be severely diminished due to no sustainable funding and the shortage of drivers.

We added that if community transport services from us and other operators were to cease, costs in health and social care budgets at local and national level would increase dramatically, as thousands of elderly and vulnerable people would lose their lifeline transport.

ECT Charity also contributed to a survey carried out by Mobility Matters, a campaign group representing over 300 community transport supporters, which quantified the likely impact of the Department for Transport’s proposed guidance.

A vital lifeline

We are pleased that during last week’s debate it became clear that many MPs agree with us and recognise the valuable work that we and other community transport organisations do in their constituencies which is currently under threat from the Department for Transport’s proposals. Grahame Morris, MP for Easington, called community transport a “vital lifeline”, Maggie Throup, MP for Erewash, said she had a “passion” for community transport, and Alex Chalk, Cheltenham’s MP described community transport organisations as “fantastic”.

Stephen Pound, MP for Ealing North, who is familiar with our work in his constituency said: “Ealing Community Transport is the exemplar; the finest example; the industry standard; the diamond mark of community transport.”

He added: “The community transport sector should be nourished, cherished, respected and admired.”

Rupa Huq, MP for Ealing Central and Acton, described her recent visit to ECT where she joined passengers on a minibus trip. She said that one of the women on the journey, who had recently suffered a fall, described the service as “a godsend”. (You can read about this here.)

She added: “These services save our local authorities a huge amount of money in avoided health and social care costs, which is the biggest bill for all local authorities at the moment.”

Here at ECT Charity, on behalf of our passengers, we would like to thank Lilian Greenwood for calling the debate. We hope that the Minister for Transport, Jesse Norman, takes on board the concerns of so many people.

Additionally, we are pleased to see that after the debate, Mr Norman wrote to local authorities to emphasise that they should not end or withhold any community transport contracts while the Department for Transport is considering its response to the consultation.

The response is expected before the summer recess of Parliament.


The full transcript of the debate is available in Hansard here and you can watch it on Parliament TV here.


Categories:

Stop the bus! MPs hitch a ride with Ealing Community Transport

April 27, 2018

Stop the bus! MPs hitch a ride with Ealing Community Transport image
Rupa Huq meets ECT passenger Susie

Ealing and Southall MPs travel on ECT minibuses for a morning to discover how community transport ends social isolation in their constituencies.

With the recent introduction of ECT Charity’s new Social Value Toolkit, community transport organisations across the UK are more prepared than ever before to put figures behind the benefit they bring to their communities – from battling isolation and loneliness, to providing access to health and social care services. But what better way to find out their true value than by hopping on an ECT bus?

On Friday 20th April, Ealing MPs Rupa Huq and Virendra Sharma spent the morning travelling on ECT’s signature green buses to meet the people behind the numbers.

Virendra Sharma travels with Mrs Sudesh Sharma on her weekly shopping trip
Virendra Sharma travels with Mrs Sudesh Sharma on her weekly shopping trip

During one of the hottest days London has seen this year, they joined journeys to collect two regular ECT passengers – Susie and Mrs Sudesh Sharma – who both use the service to go shopping for essentials.

The first stop of the day was Susie, who was accompanied on her supermarket trip in Acton by Rupa Huq. This journey with ECT is the only opportunity Susie has in her week to shop independently, which she described as a “godsend”.

After meeting Susie, Huq said: “Last month I mentioned the importance of ECT for the borough’s residents in Parliament, because I know it serves as a route out of loneliness for many. It’s amazing seeing up close the work ECT puts in to end isolation in our community on a daily basis, and meeting passengers like Susie show what a lifeline it really is.”

In Southall, MP Virendra Sharma also joined ECT bus journey, accompanying local Mrs Sudesh Sharma on her weekly groceries trip.

It was a nostalgic trip for the MP, who is a former ECT volunteer driver. He reflected on the work of the organisation continuing to end loneliness: “I was privileged enough to work as a volunteer driver in ECT’s early days, and have been thrilled to see the organisation continuing to serve people at risk of isolation like Sudesh.”

He also highlighted the role of community transport in maintaining the wellbeing of drivers as well as passengers, telling ECT that he remembers thoroughly enjoying getting to know the people he was collecting. He said: “Putting something back into the community keeps you mentally and physically active.”

He added: “Without ECT, many Southall residents would struggle to even leave their house once a week, and I hope the organisation will continue the great work it has already been doing for us for decades.”


Categories: Ealing

How do you measure up?

March 30, 2018

How do you measure up? image
Measuring Up: The CT Social Value Toolkit

ECT’s new Social Value Toolkit demonstrates ‘unique value’ of community transport

Community transport organisations across the UK have been offered a huge boost to help them prove their value amidst declining public and social sector budgets – thanks to a pioneering new toolkit created by ECT Charity.

Measuring Up: The CT Social Value Toolkit was launched at the London Strategic Community Transport Forum Annual Conference on 21 March.

ECT hopes the methodology, made possible thanks to a donation from the Monday Charitable Trust, will help community transport organisations across the UK to demonstrate the value of their work – from battling isolation and loneliness, to providing access to health and social care services.

The toolkit is made up of two parts: A Practical Guide to Measuring Community Transport Social Value, and the Community Transport Social Value Calculator. The guide sets out how and why social value should be measured, while the calculator will enable organisations to demonstrate their social value in numbers.

A key aim of the toolkit is that community transport organisations will be able to more clearly communicate their value to councils, commissioners, communities, passengers and government policymakers.

Anna Whitty, CEO at ECT Charity, said: “Looking at existing social value methodologies, we realised there was no tool that could accommodate the uniqueness of community transport and the crucial impact it delivers in helping millions of people every year across the UK – whether in accessing key services, having a day out or simply getting to the shops.

“On a daily basis, we see how community transport serves as a lifeline for many, but while anecdotal evidence is powerful, robust figures are needed.

“As local councils are reducing their budgets and community services are increasingly being cut, it is essential that CT organisations are able to measure the social value they provide in a quantifiable way.

“ECT Charity hopes that these resources will allow many more community transport organisations to demonstrate their social value and, by doing this, enable the sector to continue its vital work in communities across the UK.”

The methodology was independently reviewed by the charities and social enterprise team at Buzzacott accountants.

Edward Finch, Partner at Buzzacott LLP, said: “I believe that the toolkit is an excellent support for CT organisations in demonstrating the social value their activities create.”


Please contact socialvalue@ectcharity.co.uk for further information.

Have a look at our digital flyer here.


Categories: ECT Charity

Next stop: ending isolation! What Ealing Councillors discovered when they hopped on an ECT bus

March 12, 2018

Next stop: ending isolation! What Ealing Councillors discovered when they hopped on an ECT bus image
The Councillors accompany Susie on her weekly ECT ride home from the supermarket

Councillors from Ealing’s Transport Scrutiny Panel spent an afternoon travelling on an ECT bus, and found out how community transport can reduce effects of loneliness.

While ECT Charity has long been campaigning to raise awareness of loneliness and its devastating impact (see the 2016 Why Community Transport Matters publication), the introduction of a Minister for Loneliness in January shows that the rest of the UK is now waking up to the huge costs of social isolation.

In Ealing, where a community transport intervention has been calculated to reduce an estimated £10 million cost of loneliness by £4 million, members of local government are turning to organisations like ECT for solutions. In their roles as Chair and Vice-Chair of a Scrutiny Panel on transport in Ealing, the ‘Panel 4 on Transport’, Councillors Kamaljit Nagpal and Joanna Dabrowska spent an afternoon travelling on ECT’s usual Thursday route. The day would provide a background for their assessment of the Ealing Travel Support Strategy, a review which Anna Whitty, CEO at ECT would be attending as an expert witness.

Regular PlusBus passengers Roy and Susie were the first to be collected. The PlusBus is a service for individuals unable to use any other form of transport, who are often the most vulnerable in a community. Riding back from their weekly shop, both Roy and Susie told the Councillors that ECT is a lifeline for them – with Roy adding that without it, he “wouldn’t go out”. The Councillors also witnessed the necessity of the PlusBus’ door-to-door service when Roy, who struggles with balance, was assisted on the tricky journey to his front door with the help of John Bradley, one of ECT’s most experienced drivers.

Next stop was Hanwell’s Hobbayne Centre, where ECT collected Dementia Concern passengers from their weekly activity group. This journey was an example of ECT’s group transport services, which provides travel for voluntary and community services and works without subsidy. The Councillors were struck by passengers’ smiling faces, and their clear appreciation for the opportunity to attend activities and socialise.

John from Dementia Concern told them:

“Without ECT, we would not be able to provide our Thursday group. Our clients love the ride as it triggers memories from the past, and the driver often takes the scenic route to make the journey that much more special.”

Through meeting passengers like these, Councillors Nagpal and Dabrowska witnessed the realities and benefits of community transport for vulnerable members of the community. On feeding back to the Transport Scrutiny Panel, Councillor Nagpal told members that it had been “quite an amazing experience; a privilege”, and both tweeted the below:

“A wonderful afternoon spent with @ECT_Charity seeing the amazing work they do providing community transport services, and meeting their passengers, some of them can only leave their house because of the door to door service ECT provides.” (Councillor Nagpal)

“Spoke to service users who commented that the transport service is a godsend & lifesaver to ensure they get out & about as well as be part of the community.” (Councillor Dabrowska)

Anna Whitty, Chief Executive at ECT, said:

“We were delighted to welcome members from the Scrutiny Panel on our bus. By experiencing the routes first hand and meeting our passengers, the Councillors discovered how community transport ends isolation for many, and could reduce the Borough’s high costs of loneliness. As an expert witness at the Panel I also took the opportunity to call on the wider Ealing council to help identify lonely and isolated people stuck at home, who would benefit from door-to-door transport.”


Categories: Ealing

How London’s community transport brought fun and laughter on Christmas Day

January 30, 2018

How London’s community transport brought fun and laughter on Christmas Day image
Attendees of the Battersea Park Rotary lunch enjoying Christmas festivities

Hundreds of London’s vulnerable and elderly residents enjoyed lunch, laughter and friendship on Christmas Day, thanks to the capital’s dedicated community transport providers.

Every 25 December, London’s public transport system shuts down entirely, leaving the most vulnerable people at risk of spending Christmas alone.

But, as in previous years, staff and volunteers from London’s community transport organisations gave up precious time with their families and friends to ensure that others less fortunate than themselves could get out and about.

Anna Whitty, Chief Executive of Ealing Community Transport and Chair of the London Strategic Community Transport Forum, said: “While the rest of the country closes down on Christmas Day, community transport keeps moving.

“This is a great example of why community transport is vital to our communities. Not only on Christmas Day, but throughout the year, we work hard to end loneliness and isolation which can have such a terrible impact on so many people.”

A total of 19 community transport providers sent 92 buses out across London, aided by an army of cheerful volunteers and staff. Ealing Community Transport joined the effort, and took people who would otherwise be alone to the borough’s Salvation Army Christmas lunch.

ECT volunteer Linda said: “Our guests were collected by minibus or car and they were all ready and waiting, looking forward to the day ahead. Lunch was a great success and we all watched the Queen’s Speech after tea or coffee and mince pies. At the end of the day, we took many very happy and contented people home.”

Wandsworth Community Transport were champions in this year’s effort, ensuring that more than 400 disabled and older people could get to lunch at Battersea Park Rotary Club.

Manuel Button, Managing Director of Wandsworth Community Transport, said: “The Rotary Club lunch has been running for over 50 years; it’s huge. This year, our whole Wandsworth fleet of buses got involved, along with buses sent from the council and neighbouring community transport operators too.

“The tradition gives the borough’s isolated and elderly people a lot of fun and a decent meal on Christmas Day.”


Categories: Ealing

Bus Service 97 saved with help from Dorset Community Transport

January 18, 2018

Bus Service 97 saved with help from Dorset Community Transport image
A DCT driver helps a passenger with her shopping

A crucial local bus service has been saved by Dorset Community Transport (DCT) after it was nearly lost forever following council funding cuts.

When Dorset transport funding was withdrawn in July 2017, many users of Service 97 - which connects residents from a number of East Dorset villages to their nearest towns - feared their route out of isolation would be cut forever.

Luckily DCT was able to step in, continuing its bright green buses on the route without subsidy since the end of July, and saving the crucial local lifeline from being withdrawn.

Since then, a group of councils led by Alderholt Parish Council came together to fund the route, and a new timetable was introduced on 2nd January.

Tim Christian, General Manager of DCT, said:

“In a time of austerity cuts, and ever-dwindling facilities in rural villages, bus routes into town like Service 97 are the only way many people can access basic necessities.

“Since DCT has been running this service for the last six years, we were keen to ensure continuity for residents, despite the lack of subsidy while local communities were formulating a long-term solution. This is a prime example of what can be achieved when neighbouring parishes come together and work in partnership with a local community transport operator to provide a much needed service.”

Cheryl Arnold, a Service 97 driver, said:

“People need a reliable regular service: it’s their lifeline. We have many elderly or less mobile passengers who tell me that the Service 97 is their only route into town to buy their groceries or visit relatives. I don’t know what they would do if it were to end.”


Service 97 timetables are available from the parish offices or on our website here.


Categories: Dorset

Santa didn’t get stuck down the fire pole!

December 20, 2017

Santa didn’t get stuck down the fire pole! image
Locals enjoy a festive spread at Acton Fire Station

Firefighters from Acton Fire Station came together with Ealing Community Transport (ECT) this week to bring some festive cheer - as well as important fire safety tips - to lonely locals.

The Christmas get together was all part of ECT and Acton Fire Station’s tea party initiative, started this year with the help of the ECT Transport Fund to combat loneliness and isolation in local communities.

Alongside a spread of mince pies, seasonal songs from Berrymeade Junior School, and even a firefighter Santa coming down the pole, the firefighters also shared some important advice about staying safe.

Ben Moore, Borough Commander at Acton Fire Station, said: “Our collaboration with ECT is a great way for us to reach out to isolated people, because without the transport many of the people here today would not have been able to get here. Data from the London Fire Brigade shows that people over 60 are 60% more likely to die from a fire, and people living alone are 65% more likely to die from fire, so this is an important opportunity for us to communicate directly about how to stay safe.”

Anna Whitty, Chief Executive of ECT, said: “Evidence shows that lonely people are the most at risk from house fires, so we think it is important to collaborate with Acton Fire station in our commitment to end loneliness. Christmas can be an isolating time for many, so it was also a great socialising opportunity for local residents.”

Augustus Belfon, an attendee at the tea party, told us: “I had a great day, everyone was very friendly, and I enjoyed the talking and laughing. It was handy that the bus took us straight from our homes and back after, too.”


Categories: Ealing

Now Thornton House residents can go to the ball!

December 15, 2017

Now Thornton House residents can go to the ball! image
Mr. Geoffrey Taylor and Mrs. Marjorie Taylor share a kiss at the party

Elderly residents at Thornton House Residential Home feared they might not get to their Christmas party yesterday morning, after they were left without access to transport.

Luckily, they were able to call on their fairy godmother in the form of ECT, who sent over a wheelchair accessible minibus at the last minute, ensuring all residents could get to their festive celebration in Heswall Hall, ten miles away.

Ian Dibbert, General Manager of ECT in Cheshire, said: “I started work this morning with a call for help from a local care home in Ellesmere Port (Thornton House Residential Home). The minibus they had booked to transport them to their Christmas party was not suitable for their resident’s mobility needs, so they feared they would need to cancel the trip.

By 1:30pm my operations team and I had all residents registered with us, on the bus and en route to the party. It’s times like these which remind me why I come to work every morning, especially when I see smiling faces of residents who would have otherwise missed their event.”

Anna Whitty, Chief Executive of ECT, added: “Christmas is a time when many older people feel the effects of isolation the most, therefore we are very pleased that ECT was able to step in at the last minute. This was a perfect example of the role that community transport can play for people who are isolated or in need, not only at Christmas but throughout the year.”

Elle Holmes, Activities Coordinator at Thornton House Residential Home, said: “I wanted to thank the whole ECT team for all their help throughout the day and jumping in last minute. As you know we had a fantastic turn out and we’ll be sure to be calling them again soon.”


Categories: Ealing

ECT Charity welcomes MPs’ support for community transport

December 14, 2017

ECT Charity welcomes MPs’ support for community transport image
The Palace of Westminster in London

ECT Charity welcomes the publication of the report today from the House of Commons Transport Committee which emphasises that Government must protect the social value of community transport – the lifeline we supply to vulnerable people who would otherwise not be able to get out and about.

The Department for Transport will shortly issue a consultation looking at potential reform of the Permit system, used by community transport organisations which provide community based transport for older, disabled, vulnerable and isolated people in their communities. The vitally important Permit system has been used for decades in good faith and in line with published guidance by the Department for Transport. ECT Charity looks forward to responding to that consultation.

Matters came to a head during the summer when the Department for Transport issued a letter to community transport operators. The letter, issued on 31 July, stated that many community transport operators would need to operate under a different legal regime if they were running some types of public service contracts.

ECT Charity has always been committed to full compliance with the legislation and so we have taken specialist advice to ensure we continue to operate correctly.

ECT Charity was very concerned that the communications from the Department for Transport and other bodies were causing confusion and a great deal of uncertainty for community transport operators and local authorities. We knew from colleagues in the sector that some local authorities were considering withdrawing contracts and some community transport organisations were under threat of closure.

For these reasons, ECT Charity’s Board of Trustees decided that seeking collective advice in a coordinated way from industry experts would be beneficial to community transport operators who were unsure where to turn. As a result, our CEO, Anna Whitty, was heavily involved in the establishment of Mobility Matters, a campaign group which is supported by over 300 community transport operators from across the country.

ECT Charity gives evidence to inquiry

In November, Anna gave evidence to the Transport Committee inquiry into community transport on behalf of Mobility Matters alongside Bill Freeman, CEO of the CTA, and Frank Phillips, Chairman of Erewash Community Transport. Anna told MPs that the communications to the community transport sector from the Department for Transport and its Minister had “shown a misunderstanding of the complexity of community transport and the impact of what we do”. She clarified that community transport operates to equally high standards as commercial operators.

Anna emphasised the social value community transport generates by providing much-needed services to people who have no other transport alternatives. For example, during the last year, ECT Charity created £1.3m of social value for the communities in which it operates.

The response to the Transport Committee inquiry from community transport operators and beneficiaries was overwhelming, with an unprecedented volume of evidence submitted in support of the sector and its lifeline services. At ECT Charity we are delighted the Transport Committee members have listened and we agree with the Committee that the social value of what we do – providing essential community-based local transport services to vulnerable people who would otherwise suffer isolation – is paramount.

The need for care and sensitivity

The Committee Chair, Lilian Greenwood MP, says the Department for Transport should demonstrate care and sensitivity as it moves forward with its consultation and that “it must not use a sledgehammer to crack a nut”. We wholeheartedly agree with this and we are confident that once the Department for Transport has considered the Transport Committee report and conducted its formal consultation that it will continue to allow all of us in the community transport sector to deliver our vital services to vulnerable people across the country.

The words of one of our drivers sums up our work well. He says:

“As a community transport driver for ECT, I feel privileged to be able to make a big difference to people’s lives by enabling our older or isolated passengers to remain independent, mobile and connected with their community.

“Today, I am taking Pete on his regular weekly shopping trip. Pete has a number of health problems and he acts as a carer for his wife too. He tells me they could not exist without ECT.

Barbara is widowed and no longer able to drive. She says without ECT she would be housebound and that ‘the drivers and the service are my lifeline’.

“Our passengers remain connected to the communities they life in through the simple act of taking a ride on the little green bus.”

In the meantime, ECT Charity continues to provide our vital community transport services and we would like to thank all of our staff, volunteers, passengers and supporters for their confidence in us and in the value of the sector. Without them we could not offer these excellent services and we are truly grateful to them.

ECT Charity will continue to work with Mobility Matters on its successful campaign and we have extended an open invitation to the Department for Transport to visit us and see community transport in action.


Categories: ECT Charity

Little Green Bus brings back ‘lifeline’ Service 88 for Wimborne

November 04, 2017

Little Green Bus brings back ‘lifeline’ Service 88 for Wimborne image
Little Green Bus brings back ‘lifeline’ Service 88 for Wimborne

A much-missed bus service that disappeared when council funding dried up has been brought back to life by Dorset Community Transport (DCT).

Bus service 88 stopped running after Dorset County Council withdrew its funding for many local bus services, following a review of public transport. But DCT stepped in with a solution, supported by Wimborne Minster Town Council, Wimborne BID and Colehill Parish Council.

The new community bus service for Wimborne Minster, Colehill, Pamphill and Sturminster Marshall was launched this month and will run on Thurdays and Fridays.

Tim Christian, General Manager at DCT, said: “We are delighted to have helped provide this much-valued service, considered vital by so many local residents and greatly missed since its withdrawal.

“Without a subsidy from Dorset County Council, bus operators were unlikely to continue running services that were not commercially viable. But that is where community transport organisations like DCT can step in and help fill the gaps.

DCT – known to many as the “little green bus” – is a not-for-profit organisation established in Dorset in 2011, and operates a fleet of minibuses across the county. It runs three other local bus services, and a number of PlusBus services, through which registered members in villages that lack public transport can book a return journey to town for a flat rate return fare.

Tim Christian added: “Local bus services are a ‘lifeline’ for local residents, who often have no other means of getting into town, or reason to leave their homes. Without the bus services, and with no local facilities, residents would feel cut off from doctors’ surgeries, shops and social contact with friends. Issues arising from isolation and loneliness are “far reaching”, and particularly so for those living in rural villages.”

A spokesperson from Coleshill Parish Council said: “Realising the importance of the service to Colehill residents, the Colehill Parish Council is pleased to be able to subsidise the return of the 88 bus on Thursdays and Fridays.” While Wimborne Minster Town Mayor, Cllr Terry Wheeler commented that “The Town Council and the Wimborne BID were very pleased to subsidise this service for the benefit of local residents and are glad to hear that it is being well used.”


Service 88 timetables are available from the parish offices, Wimborne Tourist Information Centre or on our website here, where you will also find details on all of our PlusBus and Group Transport Services.


Categories: Dorset

ECT Charity celebrates WISE100 success

October 30, 2017

ECT Charity celebrates WISE100 success image
ECT Charity celebrates WISE100 success

ECT Charity CEO Anna Whitty and two ECT alumni celebrated success this week after they were named on a list of the 100 most inspiring and influential women in social enterprise, impact investment and social innovation.

In recognising the invaluable contribution of women in the social enterprise sector, the WISE100 Index – created by NatWest and Pioneers Post magazine – aims to create a new network of leaders to inspire other sectors to diversify their workforce, bringing benefits not just to women but also to business. It is now an established fact that organisations with the most gender diversity outperform those with the least, the WISE100 organisers pointed out.

To produce the list, people from across the social enterprise sector were able to nominate their women of choice via the WISE100 website and a panel of industry leaders then narrowed down those put forward.

Anna Whitty was nominated for her incredible leadership, transforming ECT Charity into a successful charity and social enterprise and a leading community transport provider in the UK. Outside of ECT Charity, Anna has done a huge amount for the sector, leading a ground-breaking report on the social value of community transport, as well as a pioneering partnership at London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games to provide the Accessible Shuttles – this was the largest operation of its kind ever attempted, making the event the most accessible Games in history.

In 2016, Anna was awarded an MBE in the Queen’s 90th Birthday Honours List in recognition of her major contribution to community transport, both locally and nationally.

Commenting on her WISE100 place, Anna said: “I am thrilled to be named among 100 leading women in social enterprise but I am only successful because of the fantastic team that I work with.

“We are proud that at ECT Charity we have many successful women managers. Transport has traditionally been seen as a male-dominated industry but we have worked hard to create an environment where everybody – women and men – can thrive.”

Antonia Orr, who joined ECT Charity through the On Purpose Associate programme, also gained a place on the WISE100 list andwas nominated for her devotion to helping other social sector organisations become more efficient and effective. Antonia is now Chief Executive at Coalition for Efficiency but continues to support ECT Charity. Whilst with ECT Charity, she worked on the development of a pioneering social value methodology for the community transport sector.

Antonia commented: “I feel very honoured to be included in the WISE100 list alongside Anna Whitty, who has been an inspiring leader and mentor for me and many other women. ECT Charity has been an important springboard for my career. Working closely with Anna and her team allowed me to experience first-hand what can be achieved by an exceptionally well-run and caring organisation which combines social business with passion.”

Geetha Rabindrakumar is another former ECT team member to make it onto the WISE100 list. Now Head of Engagement at Big Society Capital, she looks out for the interests of charities and social enterprises in the UK who struggle to access investment.

Commenting on her WISE100 place, Geetha said: “The WISE100 is a fantastic celebration of the achievements of women social entrepreneurs, and it’s an honour to be named in this list. My time at ECT over 10 years ago was my first experience of social enterprise, and it was great to be part of such a dynamic organisation where I felt that my personal contribution was always valued and judged on its own merits.”

In the UK, 40% of social enterprises are led by women, in comparison with just 6% of the companies on the FTSE100. The social enterprise sector outperforms other sectors when it comes to gender equality and as such is uniquely positioned to drive forward a campaign for gender equality that speaks both to social enterprise and corporate bodies.

At the launch event held at NatWest/RBS in London Julie Baker, Head of Enterprise, Business Banking at NatWest/RBS, said: “Tonight we are celebrating amazing women who have set up and run social enterprises. We’re also celebrating women who have helped the sector to grow, women who have given the sector a strong voice and women who are at the cutting edge of social innovation.

“They have very different backgrounds but they have one thing in common: they’re committed to making this nation a better place to live and work through enterprise.”


The full WISE100 list can be found here.


Categories: ECT Charity, Ealing

Firefighters battle isolation with cups of tea – thanks to ECT Transport Fund

October 21, 2017

Firefighters battle isolation with cups of tea – thanks to ECT Transport Fund image
Firefighters battle isolation with cups of tea – thanks to ECT Transport Fund

Firefighters at Acton Fire Station have been swapping their hoses for cups of tea thanks to a special fund created by Ealing Community Transport (ECT) to give isolated and lonely residents an opportunity for a get together.

Almost 50 Ealing residents have been able to attend a Tea Party at Acton Fire Station, thanks to the support from the ECT Transport Fund.

The Tea Party was the first community event to make use of the fund, which gives local community groups an opportunity to bid for transport funding that will stimulate new or additional community activities, especially those that benefit lonely and isolated individuals.

Successful applicants receive credit of up to £1,000 to offset the cost of transport provided by ECT, including vehicle hire, fuel costs and a driver if required.

ECT and the Acton Fire Station worked in partnership to invite people to socialise at the fire station over cake, sandwiches and other treats donated by local suppliers, plus a hotly contested raffle.

The first female firefighter in the UK, Sister Mary-Joy Langdon, was also a guest of honour.

The event proved so popular that ECT supplied two buses allowing 24 people with varying mobility difficulties from all around the borough to attend.

Firefighter Kim Jerray-Silver was inspired to organise the Tea Party after meeting a local resident on a home fire prevention visit. She said: “At the end of one particular visit an elderly lady started telling me how lonely she was. I took her name and number and told her she would be hearing from me. I know from personal experience that loneliness can be a major risk for dementia. By stopping the loneliness, you are helping to improve mental health and all round welfare.”

Kim added: “If it wasn’t for ECT, we would only have had half the people there as we did not have the necessary transport to accommodate different mobility difficulties. Having their support has enabled us to reach out to all elderly or isolated individuals in the borough, no matter what their individual needs.

“Knowing that ECT is out there to support us is motivation to want to do more – it enables us to push the boundaries and put more and more activities on.“

Lena Chance, a passenger from Greenford, said: “It was a brilliant day, which was only made possible due to the transport that allowed me to come to the fire station.”

Passenger Josephine West said: “I love the green buses, as they are very comfortable and allow me to live a more independent life.”

Anna Whitty, Chief Executive of ECT, said: “As part of our commitment to making a real difference to ending loneliness and isolation in our community, Ealing Community Transport constantly seeks innovative ways to work with local partners to provide local communities with safe, affordable and accessible transport that responds to their needs.

“This was a wonderful community event, and a perfect example of how ECT’s Transport Fund enables isolated people to leave their homes and socialise.”


To find out more about the ECT Transport Fund and how to apply click here.


Categories: Ealing

ECT Charity makes record 19,000 spectator trips for Summer of World Athletics in London

September 08, 2017

ECT Charity makes record 19,000 spectator trips for Summer of World Athletics in London image
ECT Charity makes record 19,000 spectator trips for Summer of World Athletics in London

Nearly 2,000 wheelchair users and 17,000 other spectators with a range of mobility needs were able to attend this summer’s world athletics events in London, thanks to ECT Charity.

ECT Charity’s accessible shuttle services enabled spectators, irrespective of their mobility needs, to attend the World Para Athletics Championships and the IAAF World Championships between 14th July and 13th August 2017 at London’s Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park.

Over both championships, a record total of nearly 19,000 passenger trips were made. Passenger numbers increased as awareness of the service grew, and on Saturday 12th August, the busiest day of both championships, an incredible 2,368 trips were made.

ECT Charity was delighted to be chosen as the accessible shuttle provider for the biggest sporting event of 2017, following its successful delivery of accessible shuttle services for various international sporting events, including the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, Invictus Games 2014 and the 2015 Rugby World Cup.

Shuttles ran from Stratford Station and Blue Badge Parking to the Stadium and back. Many of the passengers spoke of the difference the accessible shuttle service made to their experience of the championships.

ECT Charity shuttle bus users, Chris and Joy Kempson from Billericay, Essex said: “We would like to thank you so much your service and to all your friendly, helpful, kind and considerate staff. Quite simply, without your shuttle buses we would not have been able to attend any of these great events. We are very grateful, you really made all the difference to us.”

ECT Charity was also involved in transporting some of the 70,000 school children who attended the Para Athletics over two days – a record number of children ever at a sports venue – making this a landmark achievement.

Jane Morland, Welfare Assistant at Kennet School, said: “We travelled with a group of secondary school children to the games. Some of them have physical disabilities and use wheelchairs. Your staff were fantastic with the children, and with their disabilities. Nothing was too much trouble and they were very knowledgeable about the accessibility equipment available on your buses.”

Chris Hipwood, Head of Transport, London 2017, said: “It was a pleasure to work with ECT Charity to provide such a fantastic level of service to spectators for the athletics. Accessibility should always be at the heart of any spectator transport operation and having such professional and safe hands delivering a top-class service day-in, day-out was fantastic – enabling those who benefit from a helping hand to enjoy the Summer of World Athletics without having to worry about their journey to or from the stadium.”

Anna Whitty, CEO of ECT Charity said: “Our vision for inclusion and accessibility for all members of society whatever their transport needs, extends to major sporting events. We are proud to fly the flag for community transport, showcasing what good accessible transport looks like and making a difference to thousands of spectators. A big thank you to our partner community transport operators Tower Hamlets, Wandsworth and Westway who worked alongside us during this memorable event!”


Categories: ECT Charity

Why CT Matters: Providing Accessible Transport at the Para Athletics

August 02, 2017

Why CT Matters: Providing Accessible Transport at the Para Athletics image
Why CT Matters: Providing Accessible Transport at the Para Athletics

ECT Charity’s CEO, Anna Whitty, reflects on the charity’s involvement in the recent World Para Athletics in London. This blog was first published on the Community Transport Association’s blog here.


“Have you ever been part of something special, unusual and BIG? Say, a production or a special event that you have been rehearsing or planning for months. Then, for a few days, you give it your all and you live and breathe it until it ends?!

Taking part in a special event, especially where you play an important and critical role as a team is such an exhilarating and satisfying feeling – and the pride you feel in its overall success is the icing on the cake!

That’s how it felt to be a transport partner to the World Para Athletics Championships London 2017 at the London Stadium in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, where we delivered Accessible Shuttles to spectators for ‘the last mile’ of their journey. The knowledge that we made travel easier and participation possible for so many people was incredibly rewarding. Time and again we were told that because we had made their transport so easy, they were able to enjoy the event more than they expected and had decided to book extra tickets.

We met many inspiring people including Megan, a 9-year old junior UK wheelchair dance champion now entering the world of wheelchair racing (@AWish4Megan), and 18-year old Abbie with her sights on wheelchair tennis at Wimbledon. We were honoured to meet a gold medalist from the 1984 Paralympic Games whose face lit up when we asked after her medals, as well as 100-year old Joyce who is still able to get out and about with door-to-door accessible transport. We met a group of young people with complex health care needs and disabilities from the Nidderdale Children’s Resource Centre in North Yorkshire who were on a 3-day mini holiday to London. We also met the SENCO team from Southern Road primary school in Newham who were proud that the whole school was able to attend, including their pupils with disabilities.

However, what really stands out in our memories was the opportunity given to 5,000 community groups and 70,000 school children, many of whom have profound disabilities, to attend the Para Athletics event over two days. We are proud to have played an important role in the record breaking: a record number of children ever at a sports venue, and the most children moved to one place in a day by TfL’s London Underground. Discussions are ongoing as to whether it was the most children moved in a day since the Second World War!

You may remember that the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games set out to be the ‘public transport Games’ as well as the most accessible to date. That event raised the bar in terms of the provision of accessible transport, and set the benchmark for future international sporting events. It became our mission to keep this legacy alive by ensuring that all people, no matter their disability or mobility needs, could participate in sporting events. Further, we wanted to ensure that the community transport sector, with its gold standard approach to safety, could show the wider world what top-quality accessible transport looks like.

Working with partner community transport operators, including Tower Hamlets, Westway and Wandsworth, ECT Charity is very proud of its involvement with the Para Athletics over 10 days – promoting accessibility and proving to everyone #WhyCTMatters!”


For more photos, be sure to check out the slideshow at the end of the CTA’s blog here.


Categories: ECT Charity

ECT in Cheshire’s popular Summer Day Trips are back!

July 21, 2017

ECT in Cheshire’s popular Summer Day Trips are back! image
ECT in Cheshire offers its popular Summer Day Trips again!

ECT in Cheshire is delighted to be offering our Day Trip services again over July, August and September 2017.

We are offering Day Trips to Llandudno, Tweed Mill, Tatton Park, Liverpool, Bridgemere Garden Centre, as well as a coastal tour of North Wales.

For further details and the trips and how to book, please read our Cheshire Day Trips leaflet here.


Categories: Day trips, Cheshire

ECT Charity chosen as transport partner for World Championships

July 14, 2017

ECT Charity chosen as transport partner for World Championships image

ECT Charity is delighted to have been chosen as the transport partner for the World Para Athletics Championships and the IAAF World Championships, taking place in London between the 14th July to 23rd August.

Starting today, ECT will be delivering the accessible shuttle service, allowing all spectators irrespective of their mobility needs to attend the two events at the iconic London Stadium Stadium Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park.

The accessible shuttle service will run from platform 13 of the Jubilee Line at Stratford station to the Olympic Park, dropping off close to the Stadium.

Anna Whitty, CEO of ECT Charity, said: “We are committed to a quality model having successfully led the provision of accessible shuttle buses for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, Invictus Games 2014, 2015 Rugby World Cup and Parallel London. We are delighted to now be involved in these two major international athletics events, and to see a continued commitment by sporting bodies to making these events so accessible.”


Follow us on Twitter for up to date commentary @ECT_Charity


Categories: ECT Charity

ECT Charity stands in solidarity with Westway CT

June 26, 2017

ECT Charity stands in solidarity with Westway CT image

At ECT Charity, we recognise the importance and value of working in partnership with others to support people in the community. Following the tragic events in Kensington earlier this month, we would like to share a blog post from our friends at Westway CT that demonstrates how civil society can pull together during difficult times to support those who need it most. Westway CT’s response has been swift, compassionate and practical. Our partner’s approach is a fantastic example of the vital contribution that community transport makes to our society.

Community Pull Together After Fire at Grenfell Tower

On Wednesday the 14th of June during the early hours of the morning, our community, and then the rest of the world, witnessed the tragic fire at Grenfell Tower.

The Westway CT team are all alive and accounted for, but sadly we have two members of staff that have lost their home of 35 years. We are thankful that they escaped and are physically well and uninjured, but there is no doubt that what they saw that night, will affect them for a long time. We have another two members of staff who have lost family members and our condolences go out to them. We will be focussing on helping them all to rebuild their lives again.

Community Transport is a necessity for so many local people. Our team turned up for work early that morning, despite the major travel disruptions and road closures. We knew that it was going to be a difficult and distressing day. Doing as we normally do, we continued with our usual ‘Shopper Services’ and ‘Volunteer Cars’ journeys and took over 200 children to school in Minibuses. Several of our drivers who live in the local vicinity, many of them in a state of shock, worked tirelessly from morning into the night to assist emergency services however they could. Westway CT then made our fleet of vehicles available to the emergency planners and community activists. Some drivers moved clothing donated to the Muslim Cultural Heritage Centre, from Acklam Road to a large storage unit in Park Royal, spending hours in standstill traffic. Others helped bring food and bedding from the Rugby Portobello Club to sanctuaries nearby, for those who had been made homeless. All worked alongside hundreds of people from near and far, who wanted to do anything in their power to help. Our staff and the rest of the community pulled together like troopers and we are extremely proud of their efforts not only providing the regular work to our members but the numerous additional requests that came in.

We have offered our staff counselling, provided emergency funds to staff who have lost their homes and will be looking to offering some financial support to the bereaved. Also, we have pledged to donate £500 towards the cost of transport to an initiative that will support the children affected by this disaster during the summer period.

Rest assured that Westway CT will willingly do its part to help rebuild this community in the days, weeks and months ahead. Andrew Kelly, the Director, said, “ I feel so proud to be associated with such a wonderful and caring group of people, who once again have stepped up to the challenge and done all they can to support their colleagues, neighbours and friends”.

This terrible event has ruined the lives of so many in our community, but this will not stop us helping those in need. This community will always be spirited and its strength was evident in this time of crisis.

We would like to take this opportunity to thank those who have contacted us with messages of support during this particularly difficult week.

#WhyCTMatters

You can also read this on Westway CT’s website here.


Categories: ECT Charity

Ealing Community Transport wins national social enterprise competition

June 08, 2017

Ealing Community Transport wins national social enterprise competition image
Ealing Community Transport wins national social enterprise competition

Ealing Community Transport (ECT) has been named as the winner of a national competition celebrating the impact of social enterprises on their communities and wider society.

The Making a Mark competition, run by the international social enterprise accreditation authority Social Enterprise Mark CIC, made the announcement at a special reception this week at the CIC’s annual conference in Winchester.

The judging panel commended ECT on its ability to demonstrate considerable social impact across a wide range of individuals and community groups, both directly and indirectly, by providing accessible and affordable transport for people and groups who cannot access mainstream services.

In the last year, ECT Charity has enabled more than 98,000 passenger trips for individuals and more than 60,000 group trips for over 400 community groups. The organisation has also been able to calculate its social impact using its recently developed methodology, and in the past year, ECT’s charitable activities have had a social value of £1.3 million. In the London Borough of Ealing alone, community transport could save up to £4.1 million annually by reducing isolation and loneliness.

ECT was the clear winner of the competition, whose nominees included several well-known social enterprises including The Big Issue. ECT gained 64% of all public votes, which accounted for 50% of the final result, with the other 50% being decided by the independent Certification Panel.

Anna Whitty, Chief Executive of ECT, said: “We are thrilled to have been named as the winners of this year’s Making a Mark competition for our continued work to measure our social impact. We are committed to providing high quality, safe, friendly, accessible and affordable transport in local communities, so it’s really important that we can measure how well we are achieving these aims and what difference it makes. We are incredibly proud of these achievements and would like to thank Social Enterprise Mark CIC for their recognition of our work in this award.”

Lucy Findlay, Managing Director of Social Enterprise Mark CIC said: “ECT won because of their ability to demonstrate their social impact across a wide range of groups, including helping overcome social isolation. They clearly demonstrate social impact created for individuals using the transport, as well as contributing to the sustainability of local community groups. Well done to Anna and the whole ECT team.”


To find out more, please read Social Enterprise Mark CIC’s press release on ECT’s win here.


Categories: Ealing

DCT ‘puts best foot forward’ thanks to £25 million minibus fund

May 19, 2017

DCT ‘puts best foot forward’ thanks to £25 million minibus fund image
DCT ‘puts best foot forward’ thanks to £25 million minibus fund

A Dorset voluntary group helping people with leg-related problems has stepped up its services over the past few months – thanks to a new minibus provided by Dorset Community Transport (DCT).

The Best Foot Forward Leg Club, based in Upton, is one of several groups that has benefited after DCT received a new minibus from the Department for Transport’s £25 million Community Transport Minibus Fund.

The Club, which is part of the Lindsay Leg Club Foundation, provides community-based treatment, health promotion, education and on-going care for people of all ages who are experiencing leg-related problems. Since November 2015, DCT has provided the Club’s members with a weekly door-to-door transport service. However, the time slots available for travel were somewhat restricted. Thanks to the new minibus, DCT can now offer the Club much greater flexibility for its members.

Other groups that have benefited from DCT’s new minibus include Bus4Us, whose members live in a residential park in Dorset occupied largely by elderly residents. The park is poorly served by public transport – but DCT’s services mean the residents can now go on a monthly shopping or sightseeing trip. Favourite destinations include the Dolphin Shopping Centre in Poole, Christchurch Quay, Dorchester Market, various garden centres, Salisbury, the New Forest, and the annual Christmas trip to Winchester.

Tim Christian, DCT’s General Manager, said: “DCT already provides door-to-door transport for individuals and community groups across Dorset, but with the Department for Transport-funded minibus we have been able to expand our capacity. The new minibus has enabled us to go above and beyond our usual offering to community groups, and we are able to offer them more flexibility for when they would like to travel. This in turn has led to community groups being able to offer their members an improved service, which we are thrilled about.”


If you are a community group or charity and are interested in transport for your organisation, please get in touch on 01258 287980 or email dorset@ectcharity.co.uk


Categories: Dorset

​Ealing Community Transport has been shortlisted for national social enterprise competition

April 19, 2017

​Ealing Community Transport has been shortlisted for national social enterprise competition image
​Ealing Community Transport has been shortlisted for national social enterprise competition

Ealing Community Transport has been named as one of just seven shortlisted social enterprises for this year’s Making a Mark competition.

The competition celebrates social enterprises creating “considerable social impact within their communities and in wider society”. It is run by Social Enterprise Mark CIC, which recognises successful social enterprises through its accreditation, the Social Enterprise Mark.

The finalists have been chosen for the care they have taken in measuring and demonstrating their social impact, including how they have used their income to maximise the positive work that they are doing.

Ealing Community Transport has been selected based on our most recent Social Impact Statement. It shows the benefit we provide through accessible and affordable transport for people and groups who cannot access mainstream services – including many individuals who would otherwise find it difficult or impossible to leave their homes.

Last year, we enabled 75,340 passenger trips for 508 different community groups at subsidised rates; we set aside a fund of £20,000 through our EASIE (Elderly Accessible Service in Ealing) project, and we worked with our local Clinical Commissioning Group to provide an accessible door-to-door transport service for vulnerable patients to get to their GP appointments.

We also demonstrated how community transport can save £4m for the borough of Ealing by reducing isolation and loneliness and keeping people independent.

Anna Whitty, Chief Executive at ECT Charity, said: “We are thrilled to have been recognised by the Making a Mark competition for our continued work to achieve social impact. We are now reaching out to our friends and partners as the shortlist will go to a public vote.”


You can support us by voting for us via this link – the voting is open until Friday 5 May.


Categories: Ealing

ECT Charity launches new Vision, Mission and Values

March 23, 2017

ECT Charity launches new Vision, Mission and Values image
ECT Charity launches new Vision, Mission and Values

Following a major consultation exercise with our team, ECT Charity has developed a fresh vision and mission, and a new set of values, to guide our work as a charity and social enterprise.

As an organisation committed to inclusion and accessibility for all, we have always been driven by a clear and strong social purpose – ever since we started providing accessible transport services in Ealing 35 years ago.

Since then, both our reach and range of services have widened in scope, but our charitable purpose has remained steadfast. In addition to our work in west London, we now operate services in Dorset, Cheshire and Cornwall. We have also become known as a leader in providing accessible transport services for major events, such as the London 2012 Olympic & Paralympic Games and the 2015 Rugby World Cup. We are committed to increasing our social impact as well as measuring the social value we bring, with a focus on individuals who are lonely and isolated, and the positive impact that community transport can make.

As we have matured as an organisation, our values have developed. So, last year, we decided to explore what really matters to us through a series of interviews with our staff, volunteers and trustees.

Speaking to members of our team about things that mattered to them about ECT Charity was a truly inspiring experience. From the insights we gathered, we forged a new vision, mission and set of values. These reflect what drives us to make a positive difference; they represent what we stand for and how we approach our work – from our drivers to senior management and the board of trustees.

One of our drivers summed up the motivation that energises us all at ECT Charity: “What we do is life-changing for some people. For us, it’s not about the biggest, most noticeable thing we have done. The reason we are doing all this is because it benefits the people we serve. It’s the difference we make to a particular person’s life.”

Our CEO Anna Whitty reflects: “Going the extra mile is second nature to us, we will always bend over backwards to help, and this is true for everyone within the organisation. It was important for us to honour this by developing our organisational values, to show that they are an integral part of who we are. We are all very proud of what we have achieved so far and we will ensure our values will continue to lead the way.”


Our new vision, mission and values can be found here, and you can read more about it all in our publication “What Matters to Us” here.


Categories: ECT Charity

Cheshire’s PlusBus service unites family on special wedding day

March 23, 2017

Cheshire’s PlusBus service unites family on special wedding day image
Cheshire’s PlusBus service unites family on special wedding day

ECT in Cheshire’s PlusBus service battled heavy traffic to transport a special guest to a family wedding this week. Sarah Williams, who has restricted mobility issues, was collected by ECT in Cheshire’s fully accessible PlusBus from Vivo Care Choices, a respite centre in Ellesmere Port, to attend her brother Lee’s wedding at The Grosvenor Pulford Hotel in Pulford.

Sharron Brooks, Sarah’s mother commented, “I was so pleased the PlusBus service was able to take Sarah to her brothers’ wedding. It was great that she could be part of the celebrations and see her brother get married.”

Sharron Brooks, also said: “We had a wonderful day at my son’s wedding and the PlusBus service helped bring my family together on this special occasion. Without the great service offered by PlusBus, it would have been nearly impossible for Sarah to attend, so I would like to say thank you for their help and support in making it all possible.”

ECT in Cheshire’s PlusBus service provides door-to-door transport for people who find it difficult to use public transport. The service is available to people who have mobility difficulties and/or are aged 80+. A single journey costs £3 and a return just £5 per person.

Ian Dibbert, General Manager of ECT in Cheshire commented: “Sarah’s journey to her brother’s wedding is just one of the many journeys our PlusBus service completes every month for members of the local community. Even though most of our trips are more routine, such as visits to the doctor, shops or to see friends and family, we’re always thrilled when we are able to do something outside of the ordinary like bringing a family together on such a special occasion.”


For further information on ECT in Cheshire’s PlusBus service, and how to book, call 0151 357 4420 or see here.


Categories: Cheshire

Why ECT Charity supports International Women’s Day

March 08, 2017

Why ECT Charity supports International Women’s Day image

ECT Charity CEO Anna Whitty has been invited to share her thoughts on the opportunities and challenges for women in the transport sector, as part of a blog for the Community Transport Association to mark International Women’s Day (8th March). You can read her piece in full below:

Why is International Women’s Day so important? Above any other reason, it is about inspiring women to aim high and believe in themselves. This is particularly important in the transport industry, which is very male-dominated, particularly within the older demographic.

When I was growing up, I was expected to play with dolls, but Lego was my passion: finding a way to fit the bricks together to build something strong and stable. This mind-set has stayed with me throughout my career; for me, transport is about detailed planning in order to implement a top-quality end product.

As women, we often have the patience for this detail, and are recognised for our juggling skills - we all know that multitasking is an essential part of delivering transport! Further, we are not afraid to show our passion or that we care about our customers’ needs and passenger experience.

At ECT Charity, most of our management and supervisory roles are taken by women. These are women who believe in themselves and seized the opportunities presented to them. Ultimately, they were appointed as they were the best people for the job.

This International Women’s Day – and beyond – let’s all stand tall and proud.


To read the full blog and to hear from other leading women in the sector, check out CTA’s blog here.


Categories: ECT Charity

Dorset Community Transport welcomes council’s support for community transport

February 22, 2017

Dorset Community Transport welcomes council’s support for community transport image
Dorset Community Transport welcomes council’s support for community transport

In rural areas such as Dorset, community transport plays a crucial role in ensuring that local people are able to engage in community activities, particularly at a time when traditional transport services are being cut.

Dorset County Council has been forced to make cuts to public bus services in the sum of £1.5m over two years, and in response, it has launched various initiatives to support community transport schemes.

Over the last year, 20 trial community transport schemes have been introduced across Dorset – many of them being run by Dorset Community Transport’s (DCT) PlusBus service. Dorset County Council has also been encouraging communities to set up their own transport schemes by offering grants, toolkits and supporting volunteers.

Anna Whitty, Chief Executive of ECT Charity (DCT’s umbrella organisation) says: “We welcome Dorset County Council’s continuing support of community transport, particularly at a time when local residents need access to these services more than ever. Recently, Cllr Peter Finney, Cabinet Member for Environment, Infrastructure and Highways highlighted the financial challenges of the Council providing subsidised transport services. Community transport provides a sustainable solution to this problem, and ensures that people in rural areas continue to be able to get out and about and engage with their local community.”


To find out more about how Dorset County Council’s is supporting the community transport sector, please see here.


Categories: Dorset

ECT Charity’s Chief Executive collects MBE at Buckingham Palace

February 10, 2017

ECT Charity’s Chief Executive collects MBE at Buckingham Palace image
ECT Charity’s Chief Executive collects MBE at Buckingham Palace

ECT Charity Chief Executive, Anna Whitty, collected her MBE on 3rd February 2017 at Buckingham Palace, which she received as part of the Queen’s 90th Birthday Honours List.

Mrs Whitty was presented with her award by HRH The Prince of Wales in recognition of her major contribution to community transport, both locally and nationally.

Speaking about the experience of collecting her MBE, Mrs Whitty commented: “It was such a wonderful day and I was delighted to be able to share it with my family. Everyone at the Palace was so helpful and ensured the day was a truly special occasion for all recipients and their guests. Prince Charles showed great interest when I explained ECT Charity’s work in enabling semi-housebound, lonely and isolated people leave their homes, as well as the accessible transport we provided during the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. He was incredibly kind making it a personal and emotional day. Of course, none of this would have been possible without the hard work and dedication of everyone at ECT Charity with whom I have the privilege of working.”

On a national stage, Mrs Whitty has driven a series of high-profile engagements that have put community transport on the map and in the spotlight for both its quality of service and the positive impact it makes.

Sir Peter Hendy CBE, former Commissioner, Transport for London, now Chair of Network Rail, said: “I am delighted that Anna Whitty has been made a Member of the Order of the British Empire. She has worked tirelessly for a large part of her working life to champion the needs of people for whom regular public transport cannot offer the solution for their essential journeys. Under Anna’s leadership, ECT Charity has matured into a hugely successful organisation with high quality operations both in London and elsewhere. She and ECT Charity have set the highest standard for the provision of accessible transport and raised the level of understanding of the benefits of this with Government and other major opinion-formers nationally.”


Image courtesy of British Ceremonial Arts Limited


Categories: Ealing, Dorset, Cheshire

ECT Charity’s latest OnPurpose Associate reflects on her placement at the charity

January 25, 2017

ECT Charity’s latest OnPurpose Associate reflects on her placement at the charity image
ECT Charity's latest OnPurpose Associate reflects on her placement at the charity

Lucy Wells reflects on her past few months as an OnPurpose Associate at ECT Charity’s head office in Greenford, London. OnPurpose is a social enterprise leadership development programme which combines two six-month consultancy roles set within organisations which use commercial dynamics to create social or environmental benefit. Alongside these consultancy roles, the programme includes a rigorous professional development and training program instructed by business and social enterprise leaders.

This blog was first published on OnPurpose’s blog here.


“Watching rubbish dance in the wind and rain while the recycling trucks roll in may not be everyone’s dream view from their desk, but I love working at the depot. The sound of the buses coming and going, the oily jump wires which live under my desk, the ups and downs of breakdowns and flat batteries.

I used to find it laughable that the ex-President of Iran, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, had a PhD in Traffic Management – but I get it now, or at least I’m starting to.

I’ve always taken transport for granted, the fact that I could get from A to B easily, affordably and through a choice of vehicles. In fact, I’ve taken transport for granted so much that I’ve never stopped to really think about what an amazing thing it is.

Two months ago I started working at Ealing Community Transport and it was a catalyst for my personal journey to ‘stop and smell the depot’. And in doing so, I’ve started to realise a few things.

Transport is everywhere, we’re surrounded by it. It is a critical part of our landscape and environment. We’re so used to seeing it everywhere that we hardly even see it anymore. And it’s not just vehicles like cars, trains and buses but everything that goes with it: roads, bus stops, rivers and even the sky.

Transport moves not only us but all the critical items we need. It allows us access to education, family, food, work, play and just about anything else you can think of. Even the digital revolution relies on transport to get servers from manufacturers to racks and satellites into space.

Transport is what connects us, not just physically, but emotionally too. Because if you can’t physically get where you want to be you can’t emotionally connect with that place. Seeing a parent for a cup of tea, appreciating a great work of art with your own eyes, walking across a park covered in autumn leaves. Even just sitting in my flat I’m aware the things that make it feel like home are things I transported here to fill the empty space.

When we can’t access transport, a vital lifeline is cut off. Not being able to physically drive or use public transport leaves us vulnerable, dependent and, maybe worst of all, lonely.

And that’s what makes the depot such a magical place.

Ealing Community Transport’s vision is for inclusion and accessibility for all members of society, whatever their transport needs. One of the main services we provide is door to door transport for elderly people.

I’ll always remember the first time one of our passengers told me, ‘it’s the only time all week I leave the house’. And then the time another said, ‘I wouldn’t leave the house if you didn’t pick me up’. And really taking that in made me want to cry, because it was so sad that these people had lost their independence and because it was so uplifting to know that there is a solution which we can provide.

So, where some people see dirty roads, smell petrol fumes and hear diesel engines, I see majestic carriages, smell freedom in the great outdoors and hear the laughter of new friends being made whilst travelling on a little green bus.

No doubt this is just the beginning of my love affair with transport, but beyond the first flushes of infatuation this relationship has taught me something else.

When we’re looking to change the world we don’t necessarily need new ideas or new technology. Sometimes, the solution can be as simple as using what we already have in a different way, putting people at the centre of our mission and seeing the beauty in the mundane.”


Categories: Ealing

Panto season proves to be action packed for Dorset Community Transport

January 17, 2017

Panto season proves to be action packed for Dorset Community Transport image
Panto season proves to be action packed for Dorset Community Transport

As Christmas drew closer, Dorset Community Transport (DCT) found itself busier than ever helping young, old, vulnerable and disabled local residents enjoy pantomimes across the county.

DCT took two buses of young people from Hipp!!Bones, a specialised youth club helping youngsters with special needs in Gillingham, to the Pavilion Theatre in Weymouth to enjoy the pantomime ‘Jack and the Beanstalk’. Proving a popular production, Dorset-based bus service Bus2Go, in partnership with DCT, transported more local residents to enjoy this traditional Christmas entertainment.

Meanwhile, a group of residents from Dale Valley sheltered accommodation in Poole went even further, travelling all the way to the Mayflower Theatre in Southampton with DCT to see Shane Richie play Robin Hood, with Jessie Wallace as Maid Marian.

Anna Whitty, Chief Executive of ECT Charity, DCT’s umbrella organisation, said: “Christmas is often regarded as time for friends and family to gather and celebrate the festive period, however for many, this is not possible and the feeling of loneliness and isolation can be heightened. DCT’s services offer residents, both young and old, the opportunity to join in the festivities that many of us take for granted. We are thrilled to hear that so many people enjoyed the various pantomimes across the county.”

The Christmas fun continued throughout the pantomime season. DCT provided community transport services to Prime Time Kids Club, an activity group for youngsters in Wareham and took them to Bournemouth to see ‘Cinderella’. DCT also helped a group of young carers from Dorchester and Weymouth to see ‘Sleeping Beauty’ in Wimborne, helping to facilitate an afternoon off from their demanding responsibilities.

Tim Christian, DCT’s General Manager said: “With so many additional activities taking place over Christmas, demand for community transport is high. However, DCT relished the opportunity to help members of our community living in some of Dorset’s most isolated rural communities, remain connected with their friends and family, whilst having the chance to enjoy some Christmas pantomime fun.”


Categories: Dorset

Special Christmas shopping trips snapped up by residents across Cheshire

January 17, 2017

Special Christmas shopping trips snapped up by residents across Cheshire image
Special Christmas shopping trips snapped up by residents across Cheshire

ECT in Cheshire provided local residents with a number of special Christmas shopping trips, including visits to Tweed Mill, Manchester Christmas Market and Bridgemere Garden Centre. As a thank you to local residents for their support, ECT in Cheshire provided these trips free of charge.

Ian Dibbert, General Manager of ECT in Cheshire, commented: “For many of us, Christmas is a time of celebration, and is spent enjoying traditional Christmas activities with friends and family. Often, this includes Christmas shopping! However, many older, disabled and vulnerable people are unable to access public transport, leaving them isolated and accentuating the feeling of loneliness they may already experience.

Offering special trips to local residents at Christmas time, and providing them with the opportunity to spend time with friends and family, is one way in which we can make a difference.”

Maureen Bayley (pictured above), aged 76, from Little Sutton who went on both trips, has been using ECT in Cheshire for the last eight years. Maureen commented: “I enjoyed both trips tremendously. It was a lovely opportunity to go out Christmas shopping with my friends and we even took a break and sampled some mulled wine! The drivers were so helpful, with impeccable manners and they ensured we had the best possible journey to both places.”

ECT in Cheshire’s Christmas trips followed on from their popular programme of Summer Day Trips to places of interest, both locally and further afield. Local residents enjoyed visiting a wide variety of places including Cholmondeley Castle Gardens, Llandudno, Tatton Park, Port Sunlight, Arley Hall & Gardens, Tweed Mill, Norton Priory & Museum, Liverpool and Ice Cream Farm & Candle Workshop. Due to the success of these trips, ECT in Cheshire is pleased to be offering another programme of Summer Day Trips in 2017 and will circulate details nearer the time.


Categories: Cheshire

ECT and Salvation Army deliver Christmas joy to Ealing residents

January 17, 2017

ECT and Salvation Army deliver Christmas joy to Ealing residents image
ECT and Salvation Army deliver Christmas joy to Ealing residents

On Christmas Day, Ealing Community Transport (ECT) and The Salvation Army together enabled isolated Ealing residents to enjoy a Christmas dinner all together. ECT provided The Salvation Army with a minibus so that their volunteer driver could collect Ealing residents from their homes and take them to The Salvation Army in West Ealing for a festive celebration.

With no public transport available on Christmas Day, many vulnerable, disabled and older Ealing residents are left feeling more isolated than ever, increasing the importance and demand on community transport services.

Anna Whitty, Chief Executive of ECT said, “Although Christmas is a time for many families and friends to come together to celebrate the festive season, many older, vulnerable and disabled people can feel particularly isolated and alone at this time of year. At ECT, we were delighted to be able to help isolated Ealing residents come together to celebrate Christmas and ensure that they had an enjoyable day.”

Guests were also treated to some homemade Christmas cooking: Cynthia Alleeson (pictured above), The Salvation Army’s volunteer driver for the day and long-standing employee of ECT, cooked four turkeys and brought them to the event for guests to enjoy! Cynthia, who has been a volunteer minibus driver for over 40 years, said of her Christmas Day adventure: “Collecting Ealing residents and taking them to The Salvation Army for Christmas dinner was a fabulous way to help people enjoy this special day of the year. If it wasn’t for ECT, many of our passengers would not be able to leave their homes at all, so it’s important that even on Christmas Day we continue to offer this essential lifeline so they can enjoy life and be part of the community.”


Categories: Ealing

ECT launches Transport Fund to help community groups improve social opportunities

January 10, 2017

ECT launches Transport Fund to help community groups improve social opportunities image
ECT launches Transport Fund to help community groups improve social opportunities

Ealing Community Transport (ECT) is delighted to announce the launch of the ECT Transport Fund, established to help support organisations in Ealing create social opportunities for isolated individuals through local accessible community transport options.

Launched in December 2016, the Fund will give local community groups the opportunity to bid for transportation funding that will stimulate new or additional community activities, especially those that benefit lonely and isolated individuals.

Successful applicants will receive credit of up to £1,000 to offset the cost of transport provided by ECT, including vehicle hire, fuel costs and a driver if required.

ECT has been providing community transport services in Ealing for over 35 years. As part of its commitment to deliver a public benefit, ECT constantly seeks innovative ways to work with local partners to provide local communities with safe, affordable and accessible transport that responds to their needs.

Anna Whitty said: “For many elderly or disabled people, getting out and about, socialising as well as visiting places can be difficult. Public transport can be a challenge, further contributing to loneliness and isolation. Research shows that many older people spend every day alone - not seeing or speaking to anyone at least five or six days a week.

“ECTs Transport Fund will enable voluntary and community organisations to fulfill, and hopefully exceed, their charitable objectives and help more and more isolated people to remain active members of society. This forms part of our commitment to make a real difference to ending loneliness and isolation in our community.”


To be eligible to apply, applicants must be a community and/or voluntary group, which provides community-based activities in Ealing.

For further details and to apply, please download the application form here.


Categories: Ealing

ECT Charity continues to be recognised as a top-quality organisation

December 15, 2016

ECT Charity continues to be recognised as a top-quality organisation image
ECT Charity continues to be recognised as top-quality organisation & retains two internationally-recognised awards

ECT Charity has successfully retained two internationally-recognised awards – the Investors in People Standard and ISO 9001:2015 – reinforcing its position as a top-quality organisation.

ECT Charity’s Chief Executive, Anna Whitty, said: “ECT Charity is very proud to have retained these important accreditations – they demonstrate our commitment to delivering a top-quality service to our customers, and our dedication to supporting and developing our employees. Many thanks to all staff for their hard work and dedication in helping ECT Charity achieve its mission and retain these certifications.”

Improving customer satisfaction

In 2008, ECT Charity successfully complied with the International Standard ISO 9001:2008, which relates to an organisation’s Quality Management System (QMS) – a business improvement tool that helps put in place processes to continually improve and satisfy customers. ECT Charity’s Ealing operation is audited on an annual basis to ensure continuing compliance with the Standard – and has been successful each time in retaining the accreditation.

At the most recent audit in October 2016, ECT Charity’s Ealing operation was assessed against a newly updated version of the Standard (ISO 9001:2015) – and successfully complied. As part of this process, ECT Charity formalised its commitment to achieving its mission and commitment to quality with a “Quality Policy” – helping the charity achieve the internationally-recognised standard.

Investors in People

ECT Charity was first awarded the Investors in People (IIP) Standard for its development, support and motivation of staff in 2000 – and it has retained this accreditation ever since.

The IIP Standard defines what it takes to lead, support and manage people well for sustainable results, and provides a framework to ensure an organisation’s future progress and continuous improvement. Accreditation for this Standard is valid for three years, after which an organisation’s performance is re-audited to ensure compliance.

At the most recent IIP audit in November 2016, in addition to successfully meeting the Standard, ECT Charity was commended for valuing internal talent and fostering a culture of continuous learning and development. Further, ECT Charity was praised for valuing internal talent, identifying and celebrating good and outstanding people practices, having excellent appraisal processes and robust management strategies.

Investors in People Practitioner, Jeanette Howells, said: “I am delighted to recommend that ECT Charity achieve the Investors in People Award. ECT Charity are now definitely on the road to achieving Investor in People Sixth Generation Award at a higher level, and I have no doubt that this will be achieved.”


Categories: Ealing

ECT in Cheshire Newsletter - Winter 2016

December 01, 2016

ECT in Cheshire Newsletter - Winter 2016 image
ECT in Cheshire's Winter 2016 Newsletter celebrates the value of community transport

Read ECT in Cheshire’s Winter 2016 Newsletter here.


Categories: Publications, Cheshire

‘Little green bus’ provides lifeline for rural communities following £500k transport cuts

November 09, 2016

‘Little green bus’ provides lifeline for rural communities following £500k transport cuts image
‘Little green bus’ provides lifeline for rural communities following £500k transport cuts

Rural residents who feared they would become isolated in their own homes when the council cut funding for 26 rural bus routes, have been thrown a lifeline by Dorset Community Transport (DCT).

Dorset County Council was forced to reduce public transport spending by £500,000, following funding cuts from central government.

But Blandford-based DCT stepped in to make sure 12 of the routes could keep going, so that residents in some of Dorset’s most isolated rural communities could get out and about.

Since April, when the cuts were announced, DCT’s PlusBus service – affectionately known by some passengers as the ‘little green bus’ – has provided more than 4,000 passenger journeys, from doctor’s visits to simple but vital trips to the shops.

There are now more than 400 people registered with the service, and demand has been such that DCT has had to introduce additional services, now serving Blandford, Wimborne, Sherborne, Bridport and Dorchester in Dorset, as well as Salisbury and Yeovil in neighbouring counties.

73-year-old Mary Head, from East Lulworth, said: “I really rely on the little green bus. Where I live is very isolated, and when I found out that the council was cutting my usual route I was mortified. It actually made me feel really depressed.”

She continued: “We have one lady on the bus who is 92 and I think it’s the only time she gets out. For someone living alone, who is perhaps not able to walk very well and has not got family around, you need to be able to get out and have something to look forward to.”

Retired 87-year-old schoolmaster Allan Cooper, who lives in Wimborne St Giles and has dementia, said he wouldn’t be able to go anywhere without DCT’s bus service. “I use the bus to go into Salisbury and Wimborne, to go shopping and to the library. They drop me off at my front door and the drivers are very helpful – they even carry my shopping basket.”

His sister-in-law, Penny Cooper, commented: “Allan was extremely worried when the council cut the route – everyone was. DCT’s service is a lifeline for Allan. If you are not able-bodied and don’t have a car, you are absolutely stuck.”

Chris Kirk, from West Lulworth, said: “I was really worried when I first found out about the cuts. I would have had to change my dentist and doctor. I’m very glad for the service that DCT provides – it’s fast and efficient.”

DCT’s General Manager Tim Christian, said: “When we heard about the cuts, we were determined to help offer an affordable solution for many of the residents who had contacted us with their concerns.

“We are a charity with a mission to provide accessible transport for people who are unable to get out and about. We are so pleased that we have been able to continue making a difference for people living in some of Dorset’s most isolated rural communities.”


Categories: Dorset

ECT’s Newsletter - Autumn 2016

November 01, 2016

ECT’s Newsletter - Autumn 2016 image

Read ECT’s Autumn 2016 Newsletter here.


Categories: Publications, Ealing

ECT delivers accessible shuttle service for Parallel London

September 07, 2016

ECT delivers accessible shuttle service for Parallel London image
ECT delivers accessible shuttle service for Parallel London

ECT Charity (ECT) was delighted to be chosen as transport partner for Parallel London, the world’s first fully accessible and inclusive mass participation run for everyone of all ages and abilities.

Building on the legacy of the London Paralympics, the event was held at the iconic Queen Elizabeth Park, and transport accessibility was an integral part of the event. Thousands of people took part.

ECT delivered the accessible shuttle service to and from the start line, meeting both participants and spectators at Stratford station, and transporting them safely back to the station after enjoying the run.

Equipment was no barrier to entry, and ECT helped almost 250 participants in one day, using all types of mobility aids, get to and from the park - from power assisted wheelchairs to guide dogs, and walking sticks to crutches.

16-year old Jessica Howard (pictured above with her supporters), who is deafblind, used the shuttle service with her walking buddy Ronnie, to get to the start line of the 5km walk. She was raising money for Sense, a deafblind charity that has supported her since she was a child. Jessica said about the shuttle service: “The 5km was a real challenge for me. The accessible shuttle service saved us from further exhaustion before and after the race, and allowed me, my family and my walking buddy, Ronnie, to use transport and stay together, which was great.”

Another passenger, Dawn, was representing recovery4wellbeing, a mental health charity, with the support of her dog, Boris. She said: “Without this accessible transport service, I would not have been able to participate because it would have been too demanding for me to get to the start of the race. Boris was able to travel with me, and the team dropped us both off at the tube and helped me celebrate Boris winning his own medal!”

Another passenger, Richard Bennet, a wheelchair user, said: “These kinds of accessible services are so vital for people with mobility difficulties to allow them to participate fully.”

Diane Morgan, Project Manager at ECT Charity, said: “We had so much positive feedback from the event, which was a testament to the excellent teamwork and outstanding contributions from our staff who believe so passionately in what we are doing. For me, it was truly one of the best days we have covered at a special sporting event such as this.”

Anna Whitty, CEO of ECT Charity, said: “ECT is so proud to have partnered for such a fabulous event. We met some wonderful people who were truly inspiring. We were able to share in the joys of the athletes, their medals and their achievements, which they were so proud to share with us.

“We are committed to a quality model that we have perfected over various major sporting events, including the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, Invictus Games 2014, the 2015 Rugby World Cup, and now Parallel London. We are delighted to have been part of an event that champions accessibility for all, and understands the role of accessible transport to achieve that vision. We feel privileged to have been part of the day’s success, and to have made a difference by enabling people with mobility difficulties to attend and participate in this very special event.”

Parallel London Founder, Andrew Douglass said: ‘It was really important to us that our values of inclusivity and accessibility was present at every conceivable touchpoint of our event experience. One of the most vital aspects was accessible transport – we chose to work with ECT because of their experience and knowledge and I have to say their excellent on-the-ground teams also added to a very successful day.’


Categories: Ealing

ECT helps local community attend London’s oldest carnival

July 26, 2016

ECT helps local community attend London’s oldest carnival image
ECT helps local community attend London’s oldest carnival

ECT provides safe, accessible and affordable transport to local communities, particularly for people who are socially isolated and have mobility difficulties. On the day of the carnival, ECT worked alongside Ealing Centre for Independent Living (ECIL) to provide transport for people who might otherwise struggle to get to this event.

ECIL’s Chairman Wendy Starkie explained: “There have been so many cuts, people with mobility difficulties are struggling to get out because of a lack available transport options. They cannot afford to take taxis, so many are getting out once a week, which can leave people feeling isolated. We know people who have wanted to go to the carnival but have been unable to , so ECT really helped out.”

Two of ECT’s iconic green buses joined the parade, alongside many of ECT’s staff and their family members.

Hanwell Carnival was established in 1898 to raise funds for the Cottage Hospital (now Ealing Hospital). The parade starts at Hanwell Community Centre and travels along Hanwell’s streets towards Elthorne Park, which hosts a huge variety of entertainment and activities including a music stage, fairground, dog show and many stalls run by local charities and organisations. ECT had a stall set up throughout the day to raise awareness of our services to local residents.

Anna Whitty, ECT’s Chief Executive said “Hanwell Carnival is special, not only because of its historic significance, but because many of ECT’s staff (including myself) live in the local neighbourhood. We were delighted to support this great event and are grateful to our staff volunteers who ensured that people with mobility issues had the opportunity to enjoy this great day out!”

We had a fabulous day reminding the community about the essential work we do. Our buses in the parade and our stall in the park gave us a great opportunity to increase awareness of our services. We all know someone – whether it’s a family member, friend or neighbour – who is isolated due to lack of transport. ECT’s community-based door-to-door transport provides a life-line to these people, helping them get out and about and remain active, connected members of their neighbourhoods.”

She continued: “Our recent report “Why Community Transport Matters” outlines how community transport services help keep disabled, isolated or lonely people independent and mobile. As a result, these people tend to stay healthier and happier for longer.”


Watch our video about Why Community Transport Matters here.


Categories: Ealing

Dementia patients back on track with Big Green Bus

June 30, 2016

Dementia patients back on track with Big Green Bus image
Dementia patients back on track with Big Green Bus

Vital memory support groups for dementia patients have seen a 30% jump in attendance, thanks to a new transport partnership between West London Mental Health Trust and Ealing Community Transport.

People living with dementia benefit greatly from support groups run by the Trust’s cognitive impairment and dementia service (CIDS). However due to mobility difficulties, a lot of patients were finding the journey to attend the groups too difficult to make by public transport. Kianna Compton, assistant clinical psychologist at CIDS, was determined that travel should not be a barrier to attending these important groups, so she got in touch with Ealing Community Transport (ECT) to see what could be done.

ECT provides safe, accessible and affordable transport to local communities, particularly for people who are socially isolated and have mobility difficulties. Kianna arranged for ECT to pick up patients in their signature ‘Big Green Bus’, and drive them safely to and from their memory groups.

Kianna explains: “What drew me to ECT was the fact that they can provide transport for more than one patient at a time, and the ‘Big Green Bus’ made it easy to explain to patients what to look out for, and even remember over time. The same drivers pick particular patients up each week, which is great as consistency is really important for our patients to feel confident in their surroundings.

“The team was very good - if it was not for the support of the ECT team, our activities would not have been accessible to many of our memory groups’ patients. Since registering with ECT, the CIDS patient attendance has risen from an average of 65% to 97% attendance from referral stage to completion of the programmes.”

Desmond, CIDS service user, said: “The service has been working really well - it makes attending these groups possible for me. The drivers are always on time and polite and they can drive much better than I ever could!”

Anna Whitty, Chief Executive of ECT Charity, said: “This is a perfect example of ECT’s ability to build successful partnerships and help other community initiatives achieve their objectives. We are really proud of the near 100% attendance record and look forward to working with CIDS in the future so that more people could benefit from this valuable support group.”


Categories: Ealing

​ECT’s Chief Executive made an MBE in Queen’s 90th Birthday Honours

June 13, 2016

​ECT’s Chief Executive made an MBE in Queen’s 90th Birthday Honours image
​ECT’s Chief Executive made an MBE in Queen’s 90th Birthday Honours

ECT Charity is delighted to announce that its Chief Executive, Anna Whitty, has been awarded an MBE in the Queen’s 90th Birthday Honours List.

The honour was awarded to Mrs Whitty in recognition of her major contribution to community transport, both locally and nationally.

Mrs Whitty has overseen the delivery of a range of innovative community transport services for individuals and groups in Ealing, where ECT Charity began its life nearly 40 years ago. In recent years she has steered the charity to work with local authorities and other partners in Dorset, Cornwall and Cheshire.

On a national stage, she has driven a series of high profile engagements that have put community transport on the map and in the spotlight for both its quality of service and the positive impact it can make. These began in 2012, when ECT co-ordinated all the accessible transport for the Olympics and Paralympics, with more than 20 different community transport operators – making it the most accessible Games ever.

Sir Peter Hendy CBE, former Commissioner, Transport for London, said: “I am delighted that Anna Whitty has been made a Member of the Order of the British Empire. She has worked tirelessly for a large part of her working life to champion the needs of people for whom regular public transport cannot offer the solution for their essential journeys. Increasingly it is now recognised that giving people personal mobility delivers significant savings to the community as well as otherwise unattainable improvements to their personal health and wellbeing.”

Sir Peter, who was Commissioner from 2006 to 2015 and is now Chair of Network Rail, continued: “Under Anna’s leadership, Ealing Community Transport has matured into a hugely successful organisation with high quality operations both in London and elsewhere, as well as, with her personal involvement, helping make a huge success of the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. She and ECT have set the highest standard for the provision of accessible transport and raised the level of understanding of the benefits of this with Government and other major opinion-formers nationally.”

The London 2012 legacy continued as ECT provided accessible transport for Prince Harry’s Invictus Games and, most recently, for the 2015 Rugby World Cup. Alongside this, ECT has used the recognition from these high profile events to build the reputation of community transport in mainstream circles.

During the past year, the charity also developed a new way to measure the positive impact of community transport, and piloted a groundbreaking initiative to help GP surgeries and clinical commissioning groups give patients greater access to health services.

In partnership with global consultancy Deloitte, ECT also produced groundbreaking research showing that community transport could save more than £1 billion for health and social care agencies in combating isolation and loneliness.

Mrs Whitty said she was “thrilled at this recognition for the work of ECT Charity – it is so important to me that the legacy from our achievements at London 2012 continues, and that we can show why community transport matters in our local communities and on a national level”.

She continued: “It may be a cliché, but I could not do it without the team. The reason we do so well is because the whole team is focused on fulfilling the needs of each individual passenger – this is at the heart of our approach and the reason why community transport itself is so important to our communities.”

Patrick O’Keeffe, Chair of ECT Charity, said: “This award recognises the spirit of Anna Whitty, and the team spirit and commitment that she has fostered across the organisation, in delivering high quality transport services to the most vulnerable and isolated people across all sectors of our community.”

Mr O’Keeffe also paid tribute to Mrs Whitty’s “innovation and exceptional leadership and management skills”. He added that her achievements were all the more impressive in the “male dominated” transport industry.


Categories: Ealing

Dorset community bus service reduces rural isolation in face of council cuts

May 31, 2016

Dorset community bus service reduces rural isolation in face of council cuts image
DCT steps in to deliver rural bus routes lost to transport funding cuts

Blandford-based community transport organisation, Dorset Community Transport (DCT), is helping to reduce the impact of cuts on rural transport routes across the county by operating services on almost half of the routes previously run by Dorset County Council.

In April 2016, Dorset County Council was forced to reduce spending on subsidising public transport by £500,000, as a result of reductions to its funding from central government.

The biggest impact of these cuts was on rural bus services operating one or two days a week, with support for 26 services withdrawn, including five routes run by DCT.

At the time, DCT was running a pilot scheme of accessible, door-to-door transport for people who find it difficult to use public transport through its PlusBus service. The end of the pilot coincided with the cuts, allowing DCT to offer 12 services to the community, covering almost half of the bus routes that had been cut.

DCT also decided to subsidise two of the services that it ran for Dorset County Council on an interim basis, as part of the organisations charitable objectives.

Service user, Ella Smith, said: “I’ve been a keen supporter of PlusBus since the withdrawal of the bus services were announced. I can use the service to get into Blandford for my weekly shop and Doctor’s visits. It means everything to me, a total life line.”

Tim Christian, general manager at DCT, said: “The council changes happened within a very short time frame and it meant the local community did not have time to come together and find an alternative. However, due to the fact that DCT was already running a pilot, we were able to jump in very quickly with a solution to provide continuity and meet the essential transport needs of the area.”

Passengers will need to pre-book their journey. We are offering a variety of weekly services to a destination town across the county. It is possible to make one-off bookings and also arrange regular weekly bookings.

Tim continued: “It’s been a big cultural change for the community, but we have worked hard to engage with people on how community transport schemes can be more responsive to their needs for social and leisure journeys. We were overwhelmed by demand, queries and concerns. Now we have been able to settle into the routes that we run, the next step is to improve, refine and expand the service according to the needs identified by the community.”

Anna Whitty, CEO of ECT Charity, said: “DCT was able to respond at such short notice because we are an established and professional provider across the county, running successful and extensive services.

This is a great example of how community transport can provide a solution for those that are unable to access public transport by virtue of geographic isolation. It’s not about replicating other existing successful bus schemes, but about plugging the gaps and, in so doing, reducing rural isolation.”


For more information on the services and routes operated by DCT and how to book a journey, please email dorset@ectcharity.co.uk or call 01258 287980.


Categories: Dorset

Number 10 event puts the spotlight on community transport

May 06, 2016

Number 10 event puts the spotlight on community transport image
Number 10 event puts the spotlight on community transport

ECT Charity’s CEO Anna Whitty reflects on why Community Transport matters as David Cameron, the then Prime Minister, gives the sector a special mention

Last month I had the great privilege of attending a reception hosted by David Cameron, the then Prime Minister, at Number 10 Downing Street to celebrate Keeping Britain Moving. Fellow transport leaders and workers were also in attendance, as well as other Community Transport colleagues.

The opening speech was delivered by Patrick McLoughlin MP, then Secretary of State for Transport, who highlighted the important work conducted by the transport sector - and subsequently, we also heard from the Prime Minister, who recognised the issue of isolation in our communities and the crucial role that community transport organisations play in helping address this problem.

Too often, the general public as well as colleagues in other parts of the transport sector wrongly assume that having ‘community’ in our name means that we form part of the local council. However, as independent charities, community transport organisations provide transport for people who fall between the gaps of statutory transport provision. Many of our passengers are house-bound individuals and so we can make a huge difference to these lonely and isolated members of our communities.

It struck me that for once, in a room full of people working in the transport sector, community transport was seen as an equal partner to mainstream transport services.

We stood tall and proud amongst fellow transport colleagues - just as we did when we delivered the accessible shuttles for disabled spectators at high-profile international events such as London 2012 and the 2015 Rugby World Cup.

Times are challenging for public sector budgets, but we have an opportunity to show that community transport can be the solution for the commissioners and policymakers who want to build services that deliver quality, at the same time as supporting those in our community who are most in need.

ECT Charity’s report “Why Community Transport Matters” provides community transport organisations with a method to show local commissioners the social value of community transport journeys. With Deloitte’s help, we calculated the economic cost of lonely and isolated people across the UK, and how much public money could be saved by using community transport. Not only does community transport save the nation huge sums of money, but by helping people get out and about, it also helps people be healthier and happier.

At this Number 10 reception, community transport mattered!

#whyctmatters


Categories: Ealing

The Revd John Willmington 1945 - 2016

April 22, 2016

The Revd John Willmington 1945 - 2016 image

This week we said goodbye to John Willmington at a beautiful funeral mass at the parish church of All Saints in Twickenham, with his wife Susan and their children, and surrounded by many of his family, friends and colleagues.

It is a very sad time for us at Ealing Community Transport – John has had a long history with us, starting back in 1992 when he attended one of our community events. Twenty-six years later, and despite his illness, John still served as a Trustee.

It was not long after John’s election to the management committee that he became Chair of the Board. As ECT grew, so too did John’s role. He became a non-executive Director of the subsidiary ECT Group, which was at the time one of the largest and best known social enterprises in the UK.

In 2008, ECT underwent a significant restructuring process and returned to its core business, community transport. During this time, John stepped down from his long-standing role as Chair but took on the role of one of the founding trustees of the new ECT Charity. As always, John was a tower of strength to me as I took over the Chief Executive role. He stood by me and watched over me as my confidence grew. Sometimes his wonderfully positive feedback would make me blush, and his fantastic sense of humour would always made me laugh.

Today during the hugely uplifting mass, a celebration of John’s life, I could still hear his laugh and oft-repeated complaint at spelling his name wrong. The inspirational Homily from Father Timothy Tyndall encouraged each one of us to offer our thanks and share our thoughts with a neighbour. I was able to tell Patrick O’Keeffe, ECT Charity’s current Chair, that above all, I appreciated and was thankful for John’s loyalty. Loyalty to ECT Charity - loyalty to people with disabilities and mobility difficulties whom our charity serves - as well as personal loyalty to me. For John, loyalty meant more than anything else and it took me a while to understand and appreciate that fully. I never envisaged being at ECT Charity without John at my side, yet I take comfort knowing that John will continue to watch over us from above.

Rest in peace John, we shall miss you.

Anna Whitty 20.4.16


Categories:

ECT delivers accessible shuttle service for Rugby World Cup

April 22, 2016

ECT delivers accessible shuttle service for Rugby World Cup image

ECT was delighted to be involved in the planning and delivery during 2015 of an accessible shuttle service for all Rugby World Cup games at Twickenham and the Olympic Park.

In early 2015, ECT was involved by England 2015 to project manage and deliver accessible transport on match days. ECT led the delivery of a service in partnership with six community transport operators that helped rugby fans with mobility difficulties attend world cup matches.

Over the six-week tournament, a total of 11,149 passenger trips were made, a little fewer than 700 passengers on average at each match. Passenger numbers increased as awareness for the service grew, and at the World Cup Final itself, 977 passengers were transported to and from Twickenham Stadium.

The particular need for specialist accessible shuttles was highlighted by the number of wheelchair users who used the service: 662 over the course of the whole tournament, including 76 on the busiest night.

Shuttle bus user Julia Lock, spoke of the difference the accessible shuttle service has made to her experience of the RWC: “I suffer from severe asthma and had been very concerned about the walk to Twickenham as exercise exacerbates it. I had not been aware of the availability of the service and by the time I got from the car to the Park and Ride area I was very wheezy.

“One of your accessible shuttle drivers invited us to use the service, which was a lifesaver for me. Everyone was incredibly lovely and welcoming. Your service made my day, as without your help I would have been too unwell to have enjoyed the game.”

Mick Wright, Head of Tournament Services for England Rugby 2015, said: “Your team and your services were a genuine differentiator for this tournament and I am hugely grateful for the professionalism and dogged determination you guys put into making sure everyone understood what was needed and then delivered against it.”

Diane Morgan, Quality and Standards Manager for ECT, said: “The Rugby World Cup was a big challenge but ECT’s professionalism shone through every day. We got so much positive feedback and I am proud to have been the manager of such a great project. Would we do it all over again? You bet we would!”

Anna Whitty, CEO of ECT Charity, said: “We feel privileged to have led this collaboration to successfully deliver accessibility for all spectators at the 2015 Rugby World Cup. It was truly rewarding working with England Rugby 2015, and we thank them for their vision and commitment to making the tournament so accessible.

“The 2015 Rugby World Cup is another fantastic example of the community transport sector working together to ensure inclusion and accessibility for all members of our communities. Our hope is that the success of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, Invictus Games 2014 and now the 2015 Rugby World Cup, leads to a continued commitment from all major sporting tournaments and special events in the future to share this vision of inclusiveness.”


To read more about our success at the 2015 Rugby World Cup, read our celebratory publication A Winning Team.


Categories: Ealing

ECT launches groundbreaking report – Why Community Transport Matters

January 20, 2016

ECT launches groundbreaking report – Why Community Transport Matters image
ECT launches groundbreaking report "Why Community Transport Matters"

Today, ECT Charity publishes its report Why Community Transport Matters, an amalgamation of two ground-breaking studies led to help community transport organisations around the UK demonstrate their social value.

In the first, ECT Charity has worked with Deloitte to produce Tackling Loneliness and Isolation through Community Transport, a major piece of research into the economic cost of loneliness and isolation.

The report concludes that community transport schemes have the potential to make savings of between £0.4 billion and £1.1 billion a year for the public purse, as well as reducing pressure on public services and helping older people to remain active members of society.

The second study, A Practical Method for Measuring Community Transport Social Value, will help community transport organisations make a compelling case to commissioners on the value of their services. It was developed through the London Strategic Community Transport Forum (LSCTF).

Why Community Transport Matters, launched today, brings together the highlights from both research initiatives, including a toolkit distilled from the Deloitte research, and an introduction to the practical measurement framework.

Anna Whitty, Chief Executive of ECT Charity, said: “The next few years are going to be tough for the UK as budgets for public services continue to be cut. It is time to look at things in a different way and community transport is an important – but often invisible – part of the solution.

“Telling our story isn’t enough – we have to demonstrate the value of the benefit that we provide, especially when we are trying to convince councils, commissioners and government policymakers that community transport is a worthwhile investment.”

Lilian Greenwood MP. Shadow Secretary of State for Transport, said: “Upon reading this report, there will be no doubt in anyone’s mind as to the potentially huge benefits that community transport can deliver in communities and to public services all over the UK.”

Dr. Alice Maynard, an opinion former on Disability and Inclusion in Transport and the former Chair of Scope, said: “If we in the transport sector, who are interested in people’s wellbeing, want to make change happen and want to make sure that people are better included, then we need to be able to make the economic argument. That is why this report is so important.”

Bill Freeman, Chief Executive of the Community Transport Association, said: “Community transport, in all its forms, has the potential to offer a more reliable and resilient way of addressing a growing number of transport needs and contributing to areas of public policy where access and inclusion are significant challenges. It is vital that the CT sector can demonstrate the quality of its services, but also that they add value, so there is something that is a broader benefit beyond the simple fulfilment of the contract.”

Anna Whitty continued: “We hope that, if you are a community transport manager, this report might encourage you to make use of the methodology to start measuring your social value. And, if you are from a local authority or clinical commissioning group, maybe these ideas will help you to look afresh at the community transport organisations in your area, and support them to help you achieve your aims of improving the health and wellbeing of the people in your community.”

  • To download the report, click here.
  • For hard copies of the report Why Community Transport Matters, please email info@ectcharity.co.uk
  • Watch our video about Why Community Transport Matters below.


Categories:

Community transport charity set to transport 10,000th spectator for Rugby World Cup

November 02, 2015

Community transport charity set to transport 10,000th spectator for Rugby World Cup image
ECT Charity transports its 10,000th spectator for Rugby World Cup

Ealing Community Transport (ECT), the UK’s leading provider of transport solutions for those with mobility difficulties who are unable to access public transport services, is set to transport its 10,000th spectator to the Rugby World Cup final at Twickenham this Saturday.

Earlier this year, ECT was approached by England 2015 to provide accessible transport on match days, following its successful delivery of accessible shuttle buses for both the Olympics and Paralympics during London 2012, and the Invictus Games.

Over the past six weeks ECT has led a partnership of six community transport operators to deliver an accessible shuttle service that has helped rugby fans with mobility difficulties attend world cup matches at both the Olympic Park and Twickenham Stadium.

To date, ECT has helped spectators make over 9,400 journeys, including a staggering 917 journeys and 55 wheelchair users on the service’s busiest night so far, on October 25th at Twickenham.

As awareness grows of the accessible shuttles, ECT is seeing an increasing demand for the service, and will carry their ten thousandth passenger over this Rugby World Cup final weekend.

Shuttle bus user, Julia Lock, spoke of the difference the accessible shuttle service has made to her experience of the Rugby World Cup: “I suffer from severe asthma and had been very concerned about the walk to Twickenham as exercise exacerbates it. I had not been aware of the availability of the service and by the time I got from the car to the Park and Ride area I was very wheezy. One of your accessible shuttle drivers invited us to use the service which was a lifesaver for me. Everyone was incredibly lovely and welcoming.Your service made my day, as without your help I would have been too unwell to have enjoyed the game.”

Diane Morgan, Project Manager, said: “We have been particularly busy and we are seeing passengers who are already tired arriving by public transport. You can see the relief on their faces when they realise we are waiting to take them right to the stadium for the final part of their journey.”

Anna Whitty, CEO of ECT, said: “‘Our accessible shuttles are an important part of transport provision for spectators. I am very proud of the difference we are making to our customers Rugby World Cup experience, bringing them right up to the stadium inside the road closures. We are raising the profile of community transport and accessibility which will be part of the tournament’s lasting legacy.


Categories:

ECT helps Ealing community get away over the summer

September 23, 2015

ECT helps Ealing community get away over the summer image
The distinctive bright green ECT buses on a summer trip to the RAF Museum

Ealing Community Transport (ECT) has worked with voluntary and community organisations to reduce social isolation amongst vulnerable community groups in Ealing this summer.

For many elderly or disabled people, getting away over the summer months is not an option, as mainstream transport services do not accommodate those with mobility difficulties. Public transport can be a challenge, contributing to loneliness and isolation.

ECT’s Group Transport service provides affordable, accessible minibuses for voluntary or community organisations, including charities, social groups and schools. In doing so, ECT aims to deliver a public benefit by supporting participation, engagement and enabling local people to have more opportunities, including getting away.

Anna Whitty, Chief Executive, ECT, said: “For some individuals in our community, their needs are such that holidaying away from their homes is not an option. Getting away on these outings and day trips is equivalent to a “holiday” in itself. ECT’s larger, accessible vehicles make it possible for community groups to plan these big trips away. “

This summer’s schedule has included outings across London, including Kew Gardens, RAF Museum and Richmond Park, as well as further afield, to Brighton, Southend and Chessington World of Adventures.

In July, the Multiple Sclerosis Society (Ealing and District Branch), long-standing members of ECT, booked transport for 40 of its members to Kew Gardens, seven of which were wheelchair users.

Michael Twomey, Chairman of the Multiple Sclerosis Society (Ealing and District Branch), said: “It’s so important for such a large group of our members to get together, get out and enjoy different activities, and ECT allows us to do that. Some of our members have very limited mobility, and are reliant on the accessible transport that ECT provides. The alternative is trying to organise taxis, which is an expensive option and we certainly could not afford to do that every day. We try and use income from charitable donations as best we can. ECT’s affordable transport helps us to fulfill our objectives as a charity, otherwise we couldn’t get our members to our events.

He continued: “We have always used ECT – the drivers are friendly and interested, and they provide an excellent service. We feel very lucky to have ECT in the borough.”

Multiple Sclerosis Society (Ealing and District Branch) member, Althea Khan, has been on a number of trips with ECT over the summer, including Kew Gardens. She said: “ Lots of the people on these trips are disabled and wouldn’t get a chance to go anywhere over the summer without ECT - they’d be stuck in their house all day long. I wouldn’t be able to go very far at all – I have a motorised wheelchair.

She continued: “These trips are great – I love meeting people, everyone’s nice and we always have a lovely day out. The drivers will do everything possible to make it a good trip. I don’t know what we would do without this service.”


Categories: Ealing

ECT in Cheshire - Summer 2015 Newsletter

September 07, 2015

Ealing Community Transport - Summer 2015 Newsletter

September 07, 2015

Ealing Community Transport - Summer 2015 Newsletter image

Read the newsletter here.


Categories: Publications, Ealing

ECT apprenticeship featured in Around Ealing

September 04, 2015

ECT apprenticeship featured in Around Ealing image

Lee Digby joined ECT in January this year as an apprentice and has become a key part of the ECT team.

Have a look at the Around Ealing article and Lee’s interview.


Categories: Ealing

ECT Charity pilots a pioneering health transport service

June 11, 2015

ECT Charity pilots a pioneering health transport service image
A happy passenger arrives at her GP Surgery on the PlusBus for Health service

ECT is piloting a pioneering health transport service in Ealing this year. The service is helping to reduce the number of missed appointments, saving valuable NHS resources and promoting an integrated approach to care.

The PlusBus for Health pilot is a joint project between ECT and the Ealing Clinical Commissioning Group (ECCG) to provide transport to and from GP surgeries in Ealing. Launched in November 2014, the service aims to reduce the number of GP house calls and no-shows at surgeries, and simultaneously improve the well-being of patients by providing the opportunity to leave their homes and increase social contact.

Since its launch the PlusBus for Health has made hundreds of journeys and its popularity has grown rapidly, tripling passenger numbers in the last three months. Having started with 5 surgeries back in November, PlusBus for Health is now working with 29 surgeries in the Ealing area.

Dr Mohini Parmar, chair of Ealing CCG, said: “We are all very proud of what we’ve achieved with the PlusBus service so far. We know that there are people who end up in A&E or in hospital, as a direct or indirect result of poor access to primary care services. Transportation can be a big problem for a lot of vulnerable people, especially over 65s.

“Huge sums of money are spent each year on missed NHS appointments and missed hospital outpatient appointments. When there is suitable transportation in place, the likelihood of each appointment being missed or forgotten is considerably reduced, as you would expect. That’s why we have invested in this innovative service with such confidence, and why we will continue to do so.”

Figures from NHS England have suggested that more than twelve million GP appointments are missed each year in the UK, costing in excess of £162 million per year. A further 6.9 million outpatient hospital appointments are missed each year in the UK, costing an average of £108 per appointment in 2012/13. In Ealing, transport is already provided for vulnerable people to attend hospital appointments. However, the ECCG was keen to tackle the issue of missed GP appointments among the elderly.

Dr Beena Gohil (pictured), a doctor at Oldfield Family Practice, one of the surgeries involved in the pilot in Ealing, said: “Elderly people often avoid coming to their GP because they are not able to walk or don’t want to pay for their taxi. This means that patients will sometimes wait until it is an emergency before calling or they will miss their appointment. They then end up being admitted to hospital, at a higher cost to the NHS.

“PlusBus for Health is a successful example of an integrated approach to care. People may not be able to access healthcare for a number of reasons. This service is looking at both the social and the medical – it’s focused on the whole person. “

87 year old Lucy Sparrow, a PlusBus for Health service user who has to visit her doctor once a fortnight said: “I only live down the road, but without the PlusBus for Health service, I would not be able to get to the surgery because my legs are too painful. The service is so important for people like me.

“The service is wonderful – the people are so kind and helpful. The drivers help you get on and off the bus in your own time, you never feel rushed. They meet me at my door, they are always there on time, which removes the worry of missing an appointment. One driver took me to the surgery and waited outside. I asked her to take me to the chemist afterwards so that I could pick up my tablets, and she did. Otherwise I would have had to wait for my medication to be delivered to me, or found a way of getting there myself. Everyone is very obliging – I have got nothing but praise for them.”

Over the years, the community transport sector has sought to provide essential transport for vulnerable passengers to access healthcare. However, many existing health transport schemes have a limited reach and lack long-term funding. In a recent report*, the Community Transport Association (CTA) called for a better joint working between health, local government and community transport, with community transport to be actively considered as a fully funded option for patient transport.

Anna Whitty, CEO of ECT Charity, said: “The PlusBus for Health service has been running for six months now and I am delighted at how well ECT, the GP practices and the CCG have worked together to create a very successful pilot. It’s a fantastic example of how the community transport sector can help to deliver an integrated approach to health care not just in Ealing, but one that could easily be replicated across the country in both rural and urban environments.

By understanding the importance of promoting community transport as the viable solution, the ECCG has adopted an innovative approach, changing how things are done in the NHS. This pilot has shown how a small investment can go a long way and can save valuable resources whilst still offering a high quality service to those who need it most. We have thoroughly enjoyed developing, monitoring and evolving the pilot to provide the best transport service to our client and customers.”


Categories: Ealing

ECT takes on its first apprentice!

May 26, 2015

ECT takes on its first apprentice! image

An apprenticeship is a structured programme focussed on developing the new skills and knowledge required in a new job. Apprentices join a company or organisation and learn on the job with other employees, whilst building knowledge and skills through a series of workshops. The experience aims to improve their prospects for future employment.

In January this year Lee Digby - ECT’s first apprentice - joined the team as an Operations Assistant, helping to coordinate all aspects of the day to day delivery of ECT’s community transport services – including taking bookings, assigning vehicles and drivers, organising our fleet of minibuses and dealing with customers.

By signing up the 12-month apprenticeship scheme with Redwood Skills, ECT became part of the 100 in 100 Campaign launched by Ealing Council to encourage local businesses to create 100 apprenticeships in 100 days.

Lee, 19, decided he was not best suited to study at university and wanted to join the workplace instead. For a few months after leaving school he looked for work but he found it hard to get a job he wanted whilst his skills and experience were still limited. He then discovered the apprenticeship scheme and didn’t think twice.

After four months working at at ECT, Lee says: “The apprenticeship with ECT has changed my life completely. I struggled before I joined ECT and found it hard to find a motivation or a goal, but now working here I feel happy to work and I am developing every day.

I love that I am working for a charity helping elderly people who struggle to use transport. I live with my Nan so the work I do relates to my home life because I am helping many others like my Nan who are elderly and want to get out more. I feel blessed that I can offer people help who need it and it puts a smile on my face every time I make a phone call. I want this for the long run and my goal and ambition is to help the community change and become a better place.”

Anna Whitty, Chief Executive of ECT, said: “From day one, Lee has shown energy and enthusiasm. I am proud to see ECT providing opportunities for young people in the local area to learn new skills.”

To find out more about apprenticeship opportunities in Ealing, you can visit the Ealing Council website.


Categories: Ealing

ECT staff learn about dementia

May 18, 2015

ECT staff learn about dementia image

This week is Dementia Awareness Week. In the UK, there are about 800,000 people with dementia and it is estimated that around 400,000 people are unaware they have dementia. We therefore need to raise awareness about this condition to ensure an earlier intervention so that people suffering from dementia and their relatives have more time to come to terms with future symptoms.

In March, ECT was visited by Rachel Ibbott, a Dementia Friends Champion and On Purpose Associate. Dementia Friends is a national initiative that is being run by Alzheimer’s Society. It’s funded by the the Department of Health and the Cabinet Office and aims to improve people’s understanding of dementia and its effects. Dementia Friends was launched to tackle the stigma and lack of understanding that means many people with the condition experience loneliness and social exclusion.

What is dementia? Click here for a short video explanation.

Working at ECT, we come into contact with people suffering from dementia on a daily basis. Given that we continually strive to offer the highest quality service to our customers, we welcomed the opportunity for the staff to learn more about dementia.

Rachel spent the day giving workshops to office staff, drivers and passenger assistants about how we can all make a positive difference to people living with dementia in the community. We were given information about the personal impact of dementia and what we can do to help.

What did we learn?

  • Dementia is not a natural part of the ageing process.
  • Dementia is caused by diseases of the brain.
  • It is not just about losing your memory.
  • It’s possible to live well with it.
  • There is more to the person than the dementia.

Click here for more detail on these five points. We encourage other organisations to take part in this ground-breaking initiative. Following such a successful programme in the UK, Jeremy Hughes, CEO of Alzheimer’s Society, has now pledged to work with charities and governments around the world to help establish Dementia Friends programmes.

At ECT, we are proud that so many staff members have become Dementia Friends and we will continue to explore ways to become a more dementia friendly organisation.


Categories: Ealing

Along for the Ride: ECT Charity and Community Transport

March 24, 2015

Along for the Ride: ECT Charity and Community Transport image

David Tinnion and Antonia Orr did work placements at ECT Charity as part of the On Purpose leadership programme. Before joining, they knew very little about community transport, and their blog entry shares some insight into working at ECT Charity.


Categories:

ECT launches community healthcare transport service with local CCG

March 10, 2015

ECT launches community healthcare transport service with local CCG image
PlusBus for Health passenger arriving at her GP practice

Ealing Community Transport (ECT) is pioneering a community healthcare transport pilot initiative, PlusBus for Health, in partnership with Ealing Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG).

In Ealing, transport is already provided for vulnerable people to attend hospital appointments. However, the CCG recognised a problem with people missing appointments in primary, community and secondary settings, for example, their GP.

ECT provides the pilot service, in partnership with the NHS. The service caters for anyone who has difficulty attending health appointments due to lack of appropriate transport; people who are elderly or frail, those with mobility or health problems or those who are geographically isolated.

Anna Whitty, CEO of ECT Charity, said: “ECT is excited about the opportunity to work with Ealing CCG on this pilot, and looks forward to showcasing what looks to be a successful, integrated approach towards a new model of care, that saves valuable NHS resources and ensures that the most vulnerable and isolated people in the borough are able to attend their appointments. We look forward to developing and evolving the service and promoting community transport as the viable solution.”

To read more about the pilot, read these two articles here and here.


Categories:

ECT in Cheshire wins new contract with Cheshire West and Cheshire Council

January 30, 2015

ECT in Cheshire wins new contract with Cheshire West and Cheshire Council image

ECT Charity is delighted to announce that the organisation has been awarded a new contract with Cheshire West and Cheshire Council to deliver community transport services.

The new contracts will begin in April 2015. The PlusBus service in the Chester and Ellesmere Port area will continue to provide the fantastic door-to-door accessible transport for people who find it difficult to use public transport.

Anna Whitty, CEO of ECT Charity, said: “ECT Charity is very proud of its community transport service. The work we do, in partnership with others, is important in ensuring isolated people are able to get out, for shopping or socialising – the kind of activities that many of us take for granted. We are delighted to have won the contract with Cheshire West and Cheshire Council and we look forward to working with all our partners.”


Categories: Cheshire

Dorset community bus service spreads Christmas cheer

January 20, 2015

Dorset community bus service spreads Christmas cheer image

Dorset-based bus service Bus2Go is working to combat rural isolation this Christmas. Working in partnership with Dorset Community Transport (DCT), the organisation provides an all-inclusive, door-to-door transport service which enables everyone to get to Christmas celebrations regardless of age or mobility limitations.

This festive season has included various outings across the county and into Hampshire, including trips to garden centres, shopping malls and Lyrics and Laughter productions in the New Forest. The most recent excursion was a trip to Owermoigne Nurseries for a spot of last minute Christmas shopping, and culminating in a lunch for all those involved to share in the festive spirit.

Michael King, regular Bus2Go passenger said: “ I’ve had such a wonderful day – I’ve got a smile from ear to ear. The bus service is amazing – the service is always good, they pick me up from my front door. The DCT bus drivers are always very helpful and polite. I have nothing but good praise for them.

He continued: The service they provide is extremely important in rural areas where there is a lack of regular transport – it’s like a second life for me. I live on my own, and without the bus service I would just be sat inside watching the television alone. The service makes my life a lot easier and I get to stretch my legs, get out and about and enjoy myself and meet other lovely people. “

Margo Kirk, Bus2Go project leader, said: “Our Christmas Party outing to the New Forest was a long day, but DCT always cater for our needs and provides a flexible, empathetic service and walk passengers to the door. The DCT drivers make the passengers feel so special, it really gives them an extra boost.”

Many older people in England can find themselves lonely and isolated over the Christmas period. Dorset has an above average percentage of the population aged 65 years and above - 26% (109,000) compared with 17% in England & Wales.* This means that a high percentage of the county’s total population have a long standing illness or disability.

Aspects of living in the countryside present serious obstacles for elderly and disabled people. According to a recent report from Age UK, nearly one in four people aged 60 and over who live in rural parts of England say lack of public transport is the biggest challenge they face living in the countryside**, contributing to loneliness and isolation.

Working all year round, Bus2Go transports local people from Milborne St Andrew and surrounding villages on day trips to shopping centres, lunches, Garden Centres, Theatres and places of interest, including , the New Forest, Seaton Donkey Sanctuary, Swanage Steam Railway, Buckham Fair (Martin Clunes Farm) and Seaton Tramway.

Anna Whitty, CEO of ECT Charity, said: “The work that we do in Dorset, in partnership with local communities, is very important in making sure that people living in rural areas with no local bus service are able to get out, whether it is for shopping or socialising – the day to day activities that most of us take for granted. Our drivers will always go above and beyond, giving isolated people that extra boost of confidence.”

For more information on the Bus2Go service and how to book a journey, please emailbus2go@btinternet.com, or call Margo Kirk on her landline 01258 837749, or mobile 07917 298321. Alternatively, visit their Facebook page (Bus2Go Community Transport for Villages in the DT11 area) and/or follow them on Twitter (@bus2gonow).


Categories: Dorset

Dorset Best Village competition recognises Bus2Go as a leading community project

November 03, 2014

Dorset Best Village competition recognises Bus2Go as a leading community project image

Local retired grandmother, Margo Kirk, runs the Bus2Go service in Dorset. Unhappy with the lack of local bus services in her local area, Margo decided to start her own, launching Bus2Go in 2012 in partnership with Dorset Community Transport.

Bus2Go is an all-inclusive, door-to-door service, which enables everyone to participate regardless of age or mobility limitations. Bus2Go transports local people from Milborne St Andrew and surrounding villages on day trips to shopping centres, lunches, Garden Centres, Theatres and places of interest, including , the New Forest, Donkey Sanctuary, Swanage Steam Railway, Buckham Fair (Martin Clunes Farm) and Seaton Tramway.

Barbara Newton, Bus2Go passenger, said: “Bus2Go is a great asset to Milborne St Andrew and the surrounding area. Margo does an excellent job – if it were not for her and Dorset Community Transport, there would be no Bus2Go and we would not be able to get out and about”.

She continued: “My sister and I lost our husbands five years ago – getting involved with Bus2Go helped us overcome our loneliness, making lots of new friends and getting in touch with old school pals, which brings back lots of memories. Our grandchildren often join us too on shopping outings – the bus really is there for everyone.”

Margo Kirk, Bus2Go Project Leader, said: ”I am so thrilled, it is wonderful for the project to be acknowledged. It has its own rewards, seeing so many smiling happy faces and hearing the chatter from the passengers. Thanks to DCT – we could not do it without them. Living in the countryside has its advantages, but getting around can be problematic, especially when people grow older, can no longer driveor have impaired mobility.”

Anna Whitty, CEO of ECT Charity, said: “It’s great to be able to work in partnership with local people to reduce social isolation in rural areas, and to have that work recognised. The work that Margo and the community around Milborne St Andrew do deserves to be rewarded. We are proud to be associated with Bus2Go and would love to see this community transport partnership replicated in other villages especially where there are no regular local bus services. ”

For more information on the Bus2Go service and how to book a journey, please email bus2go@btinternet.com, or call Margo Kirk on her landline 01258 837749, or mobile 07917 298321. Alternatively, visit their Facebook page (Bus2Go Community Transport for Villages in the DT11 area) and/or follow them on Twitter (@bus2gonow).


Categories: Dorset

ECT Charity proud to play a role in the Invictus Games

October 06, 2014

ECT Charity proud to play a role in the Invictus Games image

ECT Charity is incredibly proud to have played a part in such an inspirational event. The demand-led service provided transport for over 1,300 spectators with mobility difficulties including wheelchair users from Stratford Regional station to various stops around Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, as well as for Lea Valley athletics. A team of dedicated service controllers were posted at every stop, managing the demand responsive service to ensure that it met the needs of spectators arriving and leaving each event.

For able-bodied people, the 20-30 minute walk from the station to the venues is a pleasant stroll, but for those with disabilities, and their carers, it presents a difficult journey. The service provided by ECT helped ensure this journey was easy, making the Invictus Games an accessible event for all.

Christopher Hawkings, shuttle bus passenger, commented: “We took my son who uses a wheelchair to the Invictus Games. The shuttle service from Stratford station was very efficient and all the staff we met were helpful and cheerful. It made what could have been a difficult journey so simple. We were very grateful for the service and would like to thank everyone involved.”

Paul Hurley, ECT driver, commented:“Some of the athletes travelled on our buses when supporting their team mates. It was fantastic for us to have met the Warriors themselves knowing that these Games will have made a real difference to their lives. You can’t help but be proud to be involved. Spotting Prince Harry on his bike was of course a highlight”

Anna Whitty, Chief Executive of ECT Charity, commented: “We are immensely proud of the success of our work for the London 2012 Olympics and Paralympics, which helped to make the 2012 Games the most accessible ever. ECT Charity was therefore very well placed to provide accessible transport for the Invictus Games and we were honoured to play a part in an event that creates opportunities for armed forces personnel who have been seriously wounded and injured. We were very proud to be part of the Invictus family.”

She continued: “Our organisation exists to ensure that those people who fall through the gaps of existing transport services are able to get out and about and visit inspiring events like these. ECT’s high-quality accessible transport allowed people with disabilities to attend an event that is extremely close to their hearts, giving them an opportunity to learn from and support those ex-service personnel who are inspiring recovery and generating a wider understanding of disability.”


Categories:

All aboard the surf bus!

September 21, 2014

All aboard the surf bus! image
All aboard the surf bus!

Youngsters that sign up for the six-week course were referred by education, health and social care professionals. Many of the children were in and out of foster care, or experiencing issues with their mental health; suffering from low self-esteem, depression, or self-harm.

Local surfers volunteered to work with young people, either one-on-one or in groups, and teach them to surf, helping to boost their self-confidence. After the course, young people are able to join the surf club and continue with the positive work that they have been doing.

Members of the Wave Project come from all over Dorset, some as far as thirty miles, and often come from families who are unable to support the travel to and from the coast, or where disabilities, drug or alcohol abuse or financial issues mean that access to transport for such activities is limited.

The summer program was extremely successful, the weather was glorious, and everyone involved in the project thoroughly enjoyed themselves, attributing the provision of the free bus service provided by DCT as being key to the success of the program.

Joe Taylor, Wave Project Chief Executive, said: “Dorset Community Transport plays a vital part in the delivery of our surf courses for vulnerable children in Dorset. Many of our clients don’t have access to transport and so without the support of DCT, they simply wouldn’t be able to access the courses.”

Zoe Carter, Dorset Co-ordinator, said: “The DCT drivers are always friendly. All the kids seem very enthusiastic when they get on and off the buses - so they must be doing something right! Some of the children are as young as eight, so having DCT there to help get them safely to us is great. The drivers are really helpful and really good – there are never any problems.”

Anna Whitty, CEO said: “This is a wonderful example where community transport supports the activities of other community organisations, making an impact and changing the lives of these young people. We are very proud to be associated with The Wave Project”.


Categories: Dorset

ECT Charity to provide accessible transport at Invictus Games

September 02, 2014

ECT Charity to provide accessible transport at Invictus Games image

Ealing-based community transport provider ECT Charity (ECT) is to deliver accessible transport at the Invictus Games, taking place in London, from 11-14 September.

ECT Charity successfully led the provision of accessible shuttle buses for both the Olympics and Paralympics during London 2012, making them the most accessible Games ever. This experience, combined with the organisation’s social aims and social enterprise structure, meant that ECT Charity was the obvious choice of partner for the Invictus Games.

Anna Whitty, Chief Executive of ECT Charity, commented: “ECT is delighted to be providing accessible transport for the Invictus Games. We are very proud of the success of our work for the 2012 Games which raised the bar in accessible transport provision. Our London 2012 legacy was about ensuring that mobility-impaired people would be able to attend major events in the future. With everything that the Invictus Games stands for, high-quality accessible transport will allow individuals with disabilities to attend the Games and cheer on athletes taking part in this great event.”

An international, multi-sport event hosted in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park and Lee Valley Athletics Centre, the Invictus Games will attract over 400 competitors from 13 nations. The competitors are wounded, injured and sick Servicemen and women. Teams will come from nations whose armed forces served alongside each other. The Games will use the power of sport to inspire recovery, support rehabilitation, and generate a wider understand and respect of those who serve their country.

Prince Harry was driving to bring the event to an international audience following his inspirational visit to the Warrior games in Colorado in 2013. The events in September will mark the beginning of a legacy programme to support accessibility of adaptive sport and further employment opportunities for transitioning Servicemen and women leaving the Armed Forces.


Categories:

Goodbye to MKCT

August 29, 2014

Goodbye to MKCT image

It is with great sadness that ECT Charity announces that our service in Milton Keynes, Milton Keynes Community Transport (MKCT) will be ending on 31 August after eight hugely successful years.

In 2014, the Council announced that the community transport service would end. In order to cut costs, the Council are integrating their services, as they believe that this will be more cost-efficient. Following a consultation exercise, the Council decided to end the contract and take the operation “in-house”.

Over the years, MKCT has grown into a reputable door-to-door service that has been replicated in other parts of the country and seen by transport authorities as an exemplary model of door-to-door transport provision.

ECT Charity is incredible proud of the MKCT team and all that they have achieved.

Nora Chambers, one of MKCT’s oldest and most loyal members, said: “Having the use of the PlusBus gets me out and about. I meet new people and have made some great friends over the years. It makes a huge difference to my life and I get to go around Milton Keynes and visit places that I haven’t seen before.”

Speaking of the MKCT drivers, she said: “They are very good, very helpful and really friendly. They honestly couldn’t have done more for me - they have been absolutely marvellous.”

For more information on the Council’s decision, and to hear about the history of MKCT and all that we have achieved, read our final souvenir newsletter here.


Categories:

​Abbotsbury shuttle bus services championed as huge success

July 31, 2014

​Abbotsbury shuttle bus services championed as huge success image

Earlier this year, Dorset County Council ordered a complete road closure in the village of Abbotsbury, Dorset, whilst Wessex Water carried out road works in the area. Dorset Community Transport (DCT) was asked to provide a community bus service for the duration of the water works.

Regular commercial bus services were bypassing the area, but DCT provided a solution with an exemplary minibus shuttle service, keeping communities between West Bay and Portesham connected to Abbotsbury, reducing isolation despite the road closures.

Work got underway to a very wet and blustery start on January 6, and was scheduled to take up to 12 weeks to complete. The service proved a huge success, with DCT maintaining a regular service despite the stormy weather conditions.

The road closures led to a number of complexities for home to school services in the area, but DCT ensured the smooth running of these services.

Henry Ford, Abbotsbury Parish Chairman, said: “The shuttle bus service has been excellent, particularly for the schoolchildren. Your presence here first thing in the morning, seeing that connections were being made, soon allayed fears that residents and children may be left stranded.”

He continued: “Considering the appalling weather, residents were very impressed with the cheerful and helpful nature of all the bus drivers. The ‘door to door’ service was very much appreciated. The friendly nature of your drivers will be greatly missed.”

The shuttle bus service also helped local businesses survive over the weeks. Helen Chapman, owner of the Old School House Tea Rooms, Abbotsbury, said: “Many of my regular customers come from the next village – I’m sure that without the shuttle bus service, my business would have suffered. The drivers were very obliging, dropping people door to door. The public service is just not the same, it’s not the bespoke service that DCT supplied – they provided a better service than the public bus service.”

Tim Christian, General Manager for DCT, said: “Residents have reported an enhanced bus service compared to the service they experience all year round – it really has been championed as a huge success.”

Paul Turner, Mainlaying Supervisor South, Wessex Water, said: “I had anticipated the disruption to the regular bus services to be the biggest challenge for the project. In the end, it proved to be the least of my concerns with everything running smoothly and the service being well received. I would like to thank DCT for their part in making the Abbotsbury scheme a success story.”
 
Alan Marner, Design Engineer at Wessex Water, said: “Without DCT, the scheme would most probably have been deferred. I would like to thank the drivers – they did an excellent job. The shuttle bus service played a key part in the early finish of the scheme as it meant we were able to close the road to through traffic, while keeping Abbotsbury open for business as usual.”

Anna Whitty, CEO of ECT Charity, said: “ECT is very proud of how our community transport service became part of the solution and delivered additional benefits to the community. This can easily be replicated to deliver a community minibus service in similar circumstances or where a village or community has become isolated due to cuts in mainstream bus services.”


Categories: Dorset

​Special Report: Setting gold standards for accessible transport at London 2012

July 31, 2014

​Special Report: Setting gold standards for accessible transport at London 2012 image

ECT Charity is marking one year since the London Olympics and Paralympics with a special report celebrating its gold-standard performance providing ‘Accessible Shuttles’ that helped spectators with disabilities get to watch the Olympics during London 2012.

The report relates the untold story of the remarkable achievements of 24 community transport organisations who joined forces to provide a world-beating accessible transport service for Olympic and Paralympic visitors.

Led by ECT Charity, the community transport providers delivered 100,000 passenger journeys with 150 vehicles operated by 550 drivers and 750 specially trained support staff. On their busiest day the community transport team delivered almost 5,500 trips.

The report was presented to Mayor Boris and transport minister Norman Baker this week. Mayor Boris called the team the ‘unsung heroes’ of London 2012.

At the launch, Anna Whitty, Chief Executive of ECT Charity, called on MPs, councillors and executives in central and local government to ensure that support for accessible transport would be at the heart of the London 2012 legacy. Read the full story here.


Categories: ECT Charity

CEO Anna Whitty wins Transport & Logistics Awards Director of the Year

July 30, 2014

CEO Anna Whitty wins Transport & Logistics Awards Director of the Year image

Leading figures in business gathered at the Savoy yesterday to celebrate the successes of women working in the transport and logistics sector.

The awards programme was founded to raise awareness of the varied and rewarding career opportunities available in the industry, with the ambition to increase the number of women entering into the sector as a career choice and inspiring them to excel.

Finalists for the award were drawn from an exceptional shortlist of individuals working in the UK transport and logistics industry for being best in their field and selected by a panel of expert industry judges.

Anna was appointed CEO in 2008, restructuring the Charity and transforming it into one of the country’s leading community transport providers. Anna led ECT Charity’s partnership with 24 community transport operators to provide the Accessible Shuttles service for the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, involving 150 vehicles, 100,000 journeys, over 500 drivers and 200 additional staff.

Anna was hailed by judges as not only an “outstanding business woman” but also a huge role model to the business.

Anna Whitty, CEO of ECT Charity said in her acceptance speech: “It is nice to see community transport in the charity sector being recognised by the FTA, so thank you very much. I would like to share this award with all my community transport colleagues – both the ones that I work with and the CT’s around the whole country.”

“I would like to dedicate the award to those who are isolated and housebound, the people that we provide transport for that cannot access mainstream transport. What ECT Charity do is all about making a difference to those people’s lives.”

She continued: “I would also like to thank everywoman for the recognition and Nikki Short at RBS for nominating me!”

Maxine Benson MBE, co-founder of everywoman, commented: “As the transport and logistics industry seeks to employ half a million more people, it has never been more urgent to ensure the sector attracts more talented women. Inspirational female role models enjoying rewarding careers and achieving success will do that. That’s why today’s winners are so vitally important to the industry. We congratulate them all.”

Theo de Pencier, Chief Executive of the FTA said: “The Freight Transport Association is proud to be the Title Partner of the 2014 FTA everywoman in Transport & Logistics Awards which showcase how women can make a career in transport a successful and fulfilling one. FTA is pleased to encourage forward thinking companies that are committed to introducing diversity to the freight industry, and working further with everywoman offers opportunities to expand that work. The key for our industry is to be able to access a wider talent pool and to be able to meet its need for good quality staff in whichever role it needs to fill.”


Categories: ECT Charity

Search is on for top class drivers as shining example retires from ECT

May 14, 2014

Search is on for top class drivers as shining example retires from ECT image

After dedicating over a decade of exemplary service to Ealing Community Transport (ECT), top driver Paul Hurley is set to retire at the end of April.

Paul has worked for ECT for 11 years, and is a shining example of how ECT’s staff are at the heart of the organisation. ECT is currently recruiting for new drivers – and is keen to hear from people like Paul who want a part-time rewarding role that can make a difference to people’s lives and offer a great variety of experiences.

“The work you do is really rewarding – I get a real buzz out of making someone’s day,” said Paul. “You get to meet some lovely people along the way and go to some amazing places – this job has taken me from prisons to Buckingham Palace!”

He continued: ”My favourite thing about ECT is the variety of the work that you do, and the support that is given to the staff. It’s the whole package – they really look after you. They make sure that you have suitable training and provide backup support and advice to all drivers. You are not just simply given the keys and told to get on with it,” he said.

Paul previously worked at Hammersmith Hospital as a health care assistant on the renal unit. Prior to that, he spent 31 years working as an outdoor broadcasts technician for the BBC.

Daniel Shepherd, General Manager at ECT, said Paul possessed all the characteristics of an exemplary driver and team member. “If we ever have any VIPs visiting us, it’s Paul who we put on the job ¬– he is flexible, conscientious, professional and extremely good at his job. Paul is the best brand ambassador you could ask for – his attitude and the caring way that he conducts himself is exemplary,” he said.

Paul has big plans for his ‘retired’ life. He plans to return to ECT for particular trips and special occasions, he recently signed up to an annual membership with Middlesex Country Cricket Club, and he wants to get back into another great sporting passion – playing golf.

More than anything, Paul is most excited about the chance to travel. “There are still lots of places that I have not seen – it will be nice to have someone else behind the wheel!” he says.

Anna Whitty, Chief Executive of ECT, said: “Paul has always been a favourite with our passengers and he will be missed by us all.” She added: “If anyone wishes to make a difference in their community as a potential volunteer for ECT, we would like to hear from them.”

ECT Charity recently retained the nationally-accredited Investors in People Standard for its development, support and motivation of staff, with the report highlighting how much staff enjoy working for the charity. The organisation is currently recruiting for new drivers, and would love to hear from anyone interested. Previous minibus experience is not necessary as full training will be provided. For more information on the role, click here or call 020 8813 3210.

ECT Charity will be participating at a Jobs Fair in conjunction with Catalyst Gateway on Wednesday 30th April. This event is open to all job seekers looking for work, training and advice in the West London area.


Categories: Ealing

CEO Anna Whitty shortlisted for Transport & Logistics Awards Director of the Year

May 14, 2014

CEO Anna Whitty shortlisted for Transport & Logistics Awards Director of the Year image

CEO Anna Whitty shortlisted for Transport & Logistics Awards Director of the Year

ECT Charity is delighted to announce that our CEO, Anna Whitty, has been shortlisted as a finalist for Director of the Year in the 2014 Freight Transport Association (FTA) everywoman in Transport & Logistics Awards, after being nominated by ECT’s bankers, RBS.

The FTA everywoman in Transport & Logistics Awards were founded to raise awareness of the wealth of opportunities offered by the industry and to show the variety of fulfilling careers available, particularly for women.

The awards shine a spotlight on twenty-five female champions, with the aim of highlighting their successes to encourage more women to bring their skills to the industry and inspire them to excel.

Maxine Benson MBE, co-founder of everywoman, comments, “As Britain forges ahead in its economic recovery, logistics remain essential to its infrastructure. This fast growth sector has announced a huge recruitment drive and diversity is high on the agenda with a huge variety of opportunity. We congratulate this year’s finalists who have demonstrated that their gender is no barrier to success and that opportunity exists at every level of the career ladder.”

Anna Whitty, CEO of ECT Charity said, “ It is a huge honour to be put forward for this award. It is important that the successes of women in the sector are noticed, and I hope it inspires many more to choose transport as a career option. Moreover, these awards will help to raise the profile of community transport, which is key to attracting the highest-calibre staff and help charities such as ECT to remain successful.”

The winners of the FTA everywoman in Transport & Logistics Awards will be announced at the awards ceremony, held on the 13 May 2014 at The Savoy, London. For more information on the awards, visit: http://www.everywoman.com/award/about/10


Categories: ECT Charity

ECT Charity recognised for its investment in staff

May 14, 2014

ECT Charity recognised for its investment in staff image

Putting its people first has enabled ECT Charity to retain a nationally-accredited award.

ECT Charity was awarded the nationally-accredited Investors in People Standard award for its development, support and motivation of staff in August 2009. Accreditation for this standard is retained on an indefinite basis, with the proviso that reviews take place every three years. In November 2013, the Investors in People auditor visited ECT Charity as part of this review and the charity continues to retain this impressive accreditation.

The Investors in People framework helped ECT Charity demonstrate its commitment to the on-going development of its staff who deliver transport solutions to those who are unable to access mainstream transport services.

The Investors in People Report noted that “Everyone enjoys working with the Charity. They find it a good place to work with everyone committed to ensuring the long-term future of ECT. Working as a cohesive unit with everyone focused on the key aims of the practice is a situation many leaders in other businesses would envy. The strength for people here is the ‘feel good’ factor in building relationships with people including children, parents and the elderly who they bond with and enjoy developing their ‘special’ relationship with for the benefit of everyone.”

Anna Whitty, Chief Executive of ECT Charity, says, “We are thrilled to be retaining the Investors in People recognition – it is a true testament to how ECT Charity’s staff lie at the heart of the organisation.”

Companies that have achieved the Investors in People Standard have higher levels of trust, co-operation and commitment than their competitors. In addition, they tend to have increased levels of profitability, employee engagement and productivity.

John Telfer, Managing Director of Investors in People South, said: “ECT Charity should be congratulated for the way in which management and staff have come together to produce real results. I hope other organisations in the industry will look to them as a great example of what can be achieved, and look forward to hearing about further success and award recognition from ECT Charity in the future.”


Categories: ECT Charity

ECT partners with community programme to help youngsters make a difference

May 14, 2014

ECT partners with community programme to help youngsters make a difference image

ECT partners with community programme to help youngsters make a difference

One of the key aims of ECT Charity is to enable other charities to fulfill their own objectives.

In London, Ealing Community Transport (ECT), which is part of ECT Charity, has recently been involved with the work of NCS with The Challenge, a national, government-funded programme run as part of the government’s National Citizen Service (NCS).

The Challenge programme aims to inspire young people aged 16-17 to strengthen their communities through volunteering and fundraising, with a focus on bringing together people from across generations, ethnic groups and incomes.

Young people involved with NCS with The Challenge go through three weeks of training which culminates in four days of volunteering within various community and charitable organisations.

NCS with The Challenge used ECT’s transport services throughout last summer. More recently, the organisation worked with ECT to transport various teams of participants to local charities in order to volunteer their time as part of the culmination of the programme. The volunteering included a wonderful range of activities, such as collecting for the Girl Guides, distributing Christmas cards to older people and putting on tea parties in residential care homes.

Using mainly national contractors, this was the first time that NCS with The Challenge had worked with local community transport suppliers. Their feedback made ECT particularly proud.

Dave King, Programme Manager at NCS with The Challenge, said: “ECT have been so helpful and supportive of the young people and what they do. The drivers and the team have shown a real interest, are reliable, on time and always prepared. If there were ever any last minute issues, the ECT team would always accommodate.”

Dave continued: “The professionalism of the ECT team meant that we could focus on programme work and spend more time with the service users. We were able to go anywhere within the borough, which meant that we were not restricted by bus routes and could visit a broader range of charities and community organisations. I honestly cannot speak highly enough of them. It really is a pleasure to work with the team and I want to thank them for their support.”

Anna Whitty, CEO of ECT Charity, said: “We are very keen to show how young people benefit from our transport services and this story is wonderful to see as it involves connecting generations for social good. We aim to engage with more and more youth services in the future and it has been an honour to be involved in such inspiring work.”

Anna added: “This is a fantastic example of how high quality community transport at affordable prices can make important projects like this viable to operate. It is also great to have been working with a fellow charity working towards a common goal. ECT would love to see more of these kinds of partnerships happening in the future.”


Categories: Ealing

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